PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center lands $1.2M in grants

By Marissa Harshman, Columbian health reporter

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PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center has received nearly $1.2 million in grants to fund operations and improvements to its heart and vascular center, neurosciences institute and ADAPT behavioral health program.

The PeaceHealth Southwest Foundation, the primary fundraising arm of the medical center, announced the grants Thursday.

The smallest of the grants — $158,000 — will help fund the medical center’s ADAPT program, which provides mental health services for uninsured or underinsured patients.

The program provides day treatment for individuals with a variety of behavioral health issues. The program includes group therapy, daily barriers and problem-solving discussions; coping skills classes; occupational arts and crafts; and information on proper nutrition, among other services, said Ken Cole, spokesman for the medical center.

Other hospital programs help subsidize ADAPT since reimbursement from the state for mental health services doesn’t cover the costs of the program. The grant from the foundation will also help bridge the gap, Cole said.

“The foundation is stepping in to make sure that people who are uninsured or underinsured still have access to the program,” he said. “It’s a great thing to know that people can get the care they need.”

PeaceHealth Southwest is one of the few hospitals, and the only in Clark County, that has inpatient beds and day treatment mental health services, Cole said. This year, the program has served 353 patients, he said.

The foundation also awarded a $500,000 grant to the medical center’s heart and vascular center.

The money will be used to remodel and fund upgrades to the hospital’s catheterization lab. Some of the money will also be used to pay for new technology in the electrophysiology lab, which includes care for patients with abnormal heart rhythms.

Another $500,000 grant will go to the medical center’s neurosciences institute.

Neurosciences patients are currently treated in the inpatient rehabilitation unit in the older Mother Joseph Building. Some of the money will be used to construct a designated neurosciences floor within the building and remodel the space, Cole said. The money will also help further plans for the future expansion of the physical rehabilitation unit.

The PeaceHealth Southwest Foundation is a separately incorporated not-for-profit organization.

Marissa Harshman: http://twitter.com/col_health;http://facebook.com/reporterharshman;marissa.harshman@columbian.com; 360-735-4546.