Weather Eye: July weather looks like a typical June

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Although highs will be in the 70s at least, we see another downturn in our weather pattern, with a strong marine influence the next week or so. This means days with morning clouds and afternoon clearing. There are only slight chances of moisture but I have to mention it. On days when clouds clear out earlier, highs will be in the mid to upper 70s, and near 70 degrees on other days.

That’s more like a June pattern to me. Some forecast models hint of some light showers early next week but that is too far out to worry about. At least the sunny days in between the downturns are getting longer. We managed three clear and sunny days this time around. I still do not foresee any 90-degree weather — at least not next week but perhaps the week after next.

The National Climatic Center said this past spring was the third-coolest in the past 117 years across Washington. The average mean temperature was only 44.2 degrees, which is three degrees below the long-term average. Precipitation in March, April and May averaged 13.59 inches, making it the wettest in the past 117 years. Now, mind you, these are statewide averages.

The snowmelt is still finding its way down regional rivers. Early this week, Timberline Lodge still had 100 inches of snow on the ground. That would make a bunch of snow cones — cherry syrup, please. By the way, I discovered a vendor selling snow cones at the corner of N.E. Highway 99 and N.E. 117th Street near Salmon Creek. I sure enjoy those on a warm sunny day.

We go from cool and wet to warm and dry all of a sudden it seems. Red Flag warnings were out for the lower Columbian Basin of Washington and Oregon for today, with low humidity and expected gusty winds advancing inland as the marine front heads our way. Not good news if any fires break out. Also, there could be some good dust storms as well, although not as gigantic as the one that rolled through Phoenix on Tuesday.

Pat Timm is a local weather specialist. His column appears Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays. Reach him at http://weathersystems.com.