Weather Eye: Not seasonably warm, but nice

By

Published:

 

Pleasant summer weather (in my book) continues, and we should remain dry well into next week but continue to have our afternoon highs below seasonal normal’s. Clear skies and sunshine is forecast for Saturday, and we may reach 80 degrees or so, getting close to the seasonal high of 81 or 82 degrees.

If you enjoy really hot weather, I do not see any of that heading our way in the near future. The first of August rolls in on Monday giving us a whole new month to achieve a few hot days for you sun worshippers. So stay tuned.

Some tropical storm activity in the Gulf of Mexico with the appearance of Don, which had winds Wednesday of 40 mph and is heading toward the Texas coast. This may not have the dynamics or opportunity to reach hurricane stage. More humid conditions for that region are on the way and probably plenty of rain.

So much is being said about the great heat wave this summer in the mid-section of the country. Yes, it has been unbearable, but not like the record heat wave of July 1936. Can you imagine in some parts of Nebraska having highs at 118 degrees and overnight lows never dropping below 90 degrees? I wonder if they were talking about global warming back then.

Reviewing some of the written reports from that time period, there was the amazing high of 115 degrees in Lincoln, Neb., on July 25, 1936 preceded by an overnight low of 91 degrees! And this isn’t the desert Southwest.

Even a more remarkable statistic was in North Dakota. The winter preceding the 1936 hottest summer on record for the U.S. was a very cold winter. On February 15, 1936, at Parshall, N.D., the mercury fell to 60 degrees below zero. On July 6, 1936, the thermometer registered a high of 121 degrees at Steele about 100 miles away. That is a 181 degree swing of temperatures for that year. Amazing.

Aren’t you really enjoying our afternoon highs in the 70s just about now? Have a great weekend, and I will chat with you Sunday! Take good care.

Pat Timm is a local weather specialist. His column appears Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays. Reach him at http://weathersystems.com.