Weather Eye: We might have 90s through Sunday

Fire danger in Cascades extreme

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A hot time in the old town tonight comes to mind when I think of our current string of hot weather. Although many parts of Clark County had highs of 90 degrees or better earlier this week, officially Vancouver scored its 91 degree high on Tuesday, and as of 5 p.m. Wednesday surpassed the 90-degree mark once again with 94 degrees. It is possible we could see 90 degrees or better Thursday through Sunday.

Even the coastal areas will have mostly sunny skies, especially in the afternoon, with highs in the 70s and low 80s. Extreme fire danger remains over the Cascades, and maybe a risk of a thunderstorm here and there as far north as the southern Washington Cascades.

No rain in sight, but forecast models show a hint for cooler marine air for next week with some morning clouds and afternoon sunshine. Summer isn’t over just yet, folks. At least I have noticed the overnight lows have been rather pleasant and maybe even on the cool side, especially in the outlying areas. The combination of the longer nighttime hours and low humidity makes for better sleeping conditions than if this were July or August.

Tropical storm Lee eventually fell apart Wednesday along the eastern seaboard, but not before dumping tons of rainfall. Here area a few deluge reports as of midday Wednesday: Holden, La., 15.43 inches: Waveland, Miss., 14.11 inches; Fyffe, Ala., 12.94 inches; Cleveland, Tenn., 12.22 inches; and Rome, Ga., 11.01 inches. Too bad some of that didn’t get over to Texas where they really need some rain.

Weather observer Tyler Mode of Battle Ground sent me an email Tuesday with some beautiful pictures of the brilliant autumn foliage in Alaska, rainbows and the first snows of the season up there taken on Sept. 7.

Enjoy the rest of your week, keep cool and savor the warm sun rays while we can. The seasons will be changing soon.

Patrick Timm is a local weather specialist. His column appears Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays. Reach him at http://weathersystems.com.