Bits 'n' Pieces: ‘Honeycomb’ recording star to come home

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Jimmie Rodgers fans take note: He’s due back in Camas.

One of Camas’ most famous sons is heading home for a special visit this September.

Rodgers, a recording star in the ’50s and ’60s, usually travels to Washington from Southern California at least once every few years for a fly-fishing trip and to spend time with his brother, Archie Rodgers, who still lives in the area, in Washougal, he said.

This trip, though, he has even more to look forward to, he said.

Rodgers, who has 14 gold records and penned hits “It’s Over” and “Honeycomb,” is returning for his 60th reunion with the Camas High School class of 1951.

And he plans to play two shows and participate in a book-signing at The Ballard and Call Gallery as part of his trip.

“I was just going to come up and fish and then Sharon (Ballard) asked me to sign my book and play a couple shows,” Rodgers said. “It’s going to be great fun.”

The 78-year-old will also sign copies of his book, “Dancing on the Moon,” which chronicles his decadeslong recovery from a serious head injury in 1967.

“That was the end of my music career,” Rodgers said. “I came back very slowly. I had about 20 surgeries.”

In his 60s, Rodgers taught himself to walk again and became a Christian, which helped him find the strength to write and continue working on music and film, he added.

Rodgers will sign books at the gallery at 408 N.E. Fourth Ave. in Camas from noon to 4 p.m. Sept. 24. Books cost $35, and the event is free.

He will play two shows — at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. — Sept. 25 at Journey Church at Fourth and Birch streets. Admission is $20, with proceeds going to Rodgers’ favorite charity, Meals on Wheels.

“Coming home for me has always been very special,” Rodgers said. “Washington is my favorite state.”

Scott Poole of Vancouver pens another book of poems

photoScott Poole

When Vancouver’s Scott Poole wrote his first poem more than 20 years ago, he wasn’t thinking about launching a career. Rather, he was trying to impress a girl.

It worked, because that girl is now his wife, Leslie Poole.

That first poem also got Poole, 41, hooked on writing. His third book, a collection of poems titled “The Sliding Glass Door,” is being released by Colonus Publishing.

It’s available for pre-order online (http://www.colonuspublishing.com/colonus-house), and will be released at Wordstock, Portland’s annual literary festival Oct. 8-9 at the Oregon Convention Center (http://www.wordstockfestival.com).

There will be a release party Oct. 14 at Falcon Art Community in Portland.

Poole is the former director of Wordstock. He works as a software developer in Portland and is the house poet for the weekly Oregon Public Broadcasting radio show “Live Wire!” His two previous books of poetry are “The Cheap Seats” and “Hiding from Salesmen.”

“It’s been eight years since my last book, so I’m really excited to have (‘The Sliding Glass Door’) coming out,” he said, noting that the poems re-examine perceptions of reality in a humorous way.

“What seems to be apparent actually can change in front of you quickly,” Poole said.

Bits ’n’ Pieces appears Mondays and Fridays. If you have a story you’d like to share, call 360-735-4457, or e-mail features@columbian.com.