Storm forces delay of GOP convention

By

Published:

 

Republicans announced Saturday that the first day of events have been cancelled. The rest of the scheduled speakers is subject to change.

TUESDAY

Ann Romney, former first lady of Massachusetts and wife of Republican nominee Mitt Romney

Janine Turner, actress and tea party activist

Mia Love, mayor of Saratoga Springs, Utah, and congressional candidate

Rick Santorum, former U.S. senator (Pa.) and 2012 presidential candidate

Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.)

Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R)

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin (R)

Virginia Gov. Robert F. McDonnell (R)

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R)

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R)

Sher Valenzuela, small-business owner and candidate for Delaware lieutenant governor

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez (R)

keynote address: New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R)

WEDNESDAY

Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), minority leader of Senate and temporary chairman of convention

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.)

Pam Bondi, Florida attorney general, and Sam Olens, Georgia attorney general

Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.)

Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio)

Steven Cohen, president of Screen Machine Industries

Puerto Rico Gov. Luis Fortuno (R)

Tim Pawlenty, former governor of Minnesota

Condoleezza Rice, former U.S. secretary of state

Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), vice presidential nominee

THURSDAY

Rep. Connie Mack (R-Fla.)

Bob White, chairman of the Romney for President campaign

Kerry Healey, former lieutenant governor of Massachusetts

Jane Edmonds, former Massachusetts secretary of workforce

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.)

Mitt Romney,former governor of Massachusetts and Republican presidential nominee

Republicans announced Saturday that the first day of events have been cancelled. The rest of the scheduled speakers is subject to change.

TUESDAY

Ann Romney, former first lady of Massachusetts and wife of Republican nominee Mitt Romney

Janine Turner, actress and tea party activist

Mia Love, mayor of Saratoga Springs, Utah, and congressional candidate

Rick Santorum, former U.S. senator (Pa.) and 2012 presidential candidate

Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.)

Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R)

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin (R)

Virginia Gov. Robert F. McDonnell (R)

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R)

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R)

Sher Valenzuela, small-business owner and candidate for Delaware lieutenant governor

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez (R)

keynote address: New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R)

WEDNESDAY

Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), minority leader of Senate and temporary chairman of convention

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.)

Pam Bondi, Florida attorney general, and Sam Olens, Georgia attorney general

Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.)

Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio)

Steven Cohen, president of Screen Machine Industries

Puerto Rico Gov. Luis Fortuno (R)

Tim Pawlenty, former governor of Minnesota

Condoleezza Rice, former U.S. secretary of state

Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), vice presidential nominee

THURSDAY

Rep. Connie Mack (R-Fla.)

Bob White, chairman of the Romney for President campaign

Kerry Healey, former lieutenant governor of Massachusetts

Jane Edmonds, former Massachusetts secretary of workforce

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.)

Mitt Romney,former governor of Massachusetts and Republican presidential nominee

TAMPA, Fla. — Republican officials abruptly announced plans Saturday night to scrap the first day of their national convention, bowing to the threat of Tropical Storm Isaac as it bore down menacingly on Florida.

“The safety of those in Isaac’s path is of the utmost importance,” tweeted Mitt Romney, his formal nomination as presidential candidate pushed back by a minimum of 24 hours from Monday night to Tuesday.

The announcement was made as convention-goers flocked to the Tampa Bay area by the planeload for what had been scripted as four days of political pageantry and speechmaking with a purpose — to propel Romney into the fall campaign against President Barack Obama.

Officials said they hoped to begin laying out a revised schedule on Sunday.

Romney campaigned in battleground Ohio during the day Saturday, pledging to help female entrepreneurs and innovators who are eager to create small businesses and the jobs that go with them. It was an economy-themed countdown to a convention taking shape in a city already bristling with security — and bracing for a possible hurricane.

“Women in this country are more likely to start businesses than men. Women need our help,” said the Republican presidential challenger, eager to relegate recent controversy over abortion to the sidelines and make the nation’s slow economic recovery the dominant issue of his convention week.

Consolidating schedule

Reince Priebus, the Republican Party chairman, told reporters on an early evening conference call that no state delegations had changed their travel plans because of the storm. “Everyone is planning on being here and we hope we are up and running and expect all of our delegates to be here,” he said.

Yet with rain and high winds in the forecast, and with the threat of a storm surge and possible flooding, convention organizers said they were making contingency plans to move delegates who have been booked into beachfront hotels to other locations if necessary.

“Our first priority is ensuring the safety of delegates, alternates, guests, members of the media attending the Republican National Convention, and citizens of the Tampa Bay area,” convention CEO Bill Harris said in an emailed announcement that followed private conversations involving Romney’s campaign, Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s office, security officials and others.

The announcement said that while the convention would officially be gaveled into session on Monday as scheduled, the day’s events would be cancelled until Tuesday.

The announcement made the GOP convention the party’s second in a row to be disrupted by weather. Four years ago, the delegates gathered in St. Paul, Minn., but Hurricane Gustav, slamming the Gulf Coast, led to a one-day postponement.

In that case, party officials rewrote their script to make President George W. Bush’s speech into a video appearance, and to cancel plans for Vice President Dick Cheney to appear before the delegates. Both men were unpopular at the time.

Four years later, there was no immediate sign that Romney’s forces would do anything other than squeeze two nights’ of platform programming into one. Nor did it appear the postponement would cost them much in political terms, since the television networks had already announced they would not be carrying any of Monday’s events live.

Despite the disruption, Priebus said, “we are optimistic that we will begin an exciting, robust convention that will nominate the Romney-Ryan ticket.”

Plans had called for the convention to open Monday with quick ratification of a conservative platform expected, followed by Romney’s nomination in a traditional roll call of the states timed for network evening news coverage.

Barring further postponements it will end Thursday with his prime-time acceptance speech, which aides hope will propel him into a successful fall campaign and, eventually, the White House.

Race continues to be tight

The polls made the race a close one, narrow advantage to Obama, as two weeks of back-to-back conventions approached. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent on television ads, with hundreds of million more to come, almost all of it airing in a small group of battleground states expected to settle the election.

The list included Florida as well as North Carolina, where the Democratic National Convention will be held in one week’s time.

Scott declared a state of emergency earlier in the day as the storm approached the Florida Keys, more than 400 miles from Tampa. Forecasters said it was on a track to head west of the convention city, but predicted strong winds and rain at a minimum on Monday as the delegates were to board buses for their first trip to the hall.

“We are a hospitality state. We know how to take care of people and we want to ensure their safety,” Scott said.

Apart from weather concerns, a heavy security presence was already in evidence. Miles of fencing were designed to create a secure zone around a tract of land that included the convention hall, the hotel where Romney will stay and a nearby convention center where journalists and others worked.

Plans for Vice President Joe Biden to campaign in Florida were canceled, also because of the threat posed by the storm.