Weather Eye: Brace yourself: Snow, coastal winds on way

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photoPatrick Timm

It looks like we will finally see some active weather heading our way today and Friday with heavy mountain snows and strong winds along the coast. Almost like the giant weather machine has awoken from a late winter slumber.

Snow levels will be low for the next few days with the white stuff falling down into the coastal mountains and the Cascade foothills. We may see a few wet flakes in the air early Saturday, but a slim chance of a ground cover, but then again this is the Northwest!

So if you want to do a little storm watching head to the ocean beaches Friday, where the rain will be horizontal and the surf will be crashing against the shoreline. Be careful. Another choice of a different kind would be head to the mountains where blizzardlike conditions will exist with winds up to 50 mph and very heavy snow, even at Government Camp. Both encounters will be dangerous so be advised. The Cascade mountains should easily get upwards of 2 feet of snow the next few days.

Here in the lowlands it will remain on the cool side for the next week or so, looking at computer forecast models, so no balmy weather headed our way any time soon. If you want to keep ahead of the storms or find out where all the action is, the National Weather Service has a very good web, site with all the latest. I find it to be a top-notch source of information from coast to coast. Go to: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

I'm ready for spring and that April showers bringing May flowers routine. But first we need to complete the month of February and get through the sometimes precarious March weather. March can be such a fickle month as the weather patterns slowly begin to change from a winter pattern. It probably is the most unpredictable month. Wet snow showers, hail, thunderstorms and blustery winds can be on the menu.

See you on Sunday!

Patrick Timm is a local weather specialist. His column appears Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays. Reach him at Weather Systems.