Merkel wins third term in German vote

She faces challenge of forming coalition with center-left rival

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BERLIN — Chancellor Angela Merkel led her conservatives to victory in Germany's election Sunday, a personal triumph that cements her position as Europe's most powerful leader. However, she will need to reach out to center-left rivals to form a new government after her coalition partner crashed out of Parliament.

Merkel's Union bloc scored its best result in 23 years to put her on course for a third term, winning 41.5 percent of the vote and finishing only five seats short of an absolute majority in the lower house.

The 59-year-old benefited from a strong economy and low unemployment that have helped keep her popularity sky-high, a contrast to the string of leaders who have lost their jobs in other European countries since the continent's debt crisis erupted three years ago. A new coalition probably won't result in any major shifts in German policy, though it could bring a slightly softer tone to managing the crisis.

Merkel, Germany's chancellor since 2005 and the de facto leader of the European crisis response that has mixed aid with austerity, told supporters it was "a super result." She wouldn't speculate about the shape of the next government, but made clear she plans to serve a full term.

"I can promise that we will face many tasks, at home, in Europe and in the world," Merkel said in a TV appearance with other party leaders.

Despite the scale of her win, governing isn't likely to get easier for Merkel.

Her partners of choice, the pro-business Free Democrats, won 4.8 percent of the vote. They fell short of the 5 percent needed to win seats in Parliament for the first time in Germany's post-World War II history, paying the price for frequent governing infighting and their failure to secure tax cuts they pledged four years ago.

Merkel looks likely to end up leading either a grand coalition government with the center-left Social Democrats of defeated challenger Peer Steinbrueck or, less likely, with the environmentalist Greens. Either way, several weeks of difficult negotiations are expected.

"The ball is in Merkel's court," said Steinbrueck, a former finance minister under Merkel who has said he won't serve under her again. "She has to get herself a majority."

Merkel's conservatives finished far ahead of Steinbrueck's Social Democrats, who won 25.7 percent of the vote, not much better than the post-war low of 23 percent they hit four years ago.

Their Green allies polled a disappointing 8.4 percent, while the hard-line Left Party scored 8.6 percent. But although the three parties on the left together hold a thin parliamentary majority, there's virtually no chance of them governing together.

The Left Party includes heirs of East Germany's former communist rulers, opposes German military deployments abroad and is the only party that voted against Merkel's policies of bailing out debt-troubled European countries in exchange for reforms. The two center-left parties Sunday renewed promises not to form an alliance with the Left.

Merkel's conservatives, the Social Democrats and Greens "have largely similar positions" on Europe, said Oscar Gabriel, a political science professor at Stuttgart University. He noted, however, that "there are a few nuances," with the center-left parties more open to limited pooling of European countries' debt something the chancellor has refused to countenance.

Sunday's result gives the conservative bloc of Merkel's Christian Democratic Union and its Bavaria-only sister, the Christian Social Union, 311 seats in Parliament. The Social Democrats won 192 seats, the Greens 63 and the Left Party 64.Turnout edged up to 71.5 percent from 70.8 percent four years ago.