Letter: Oil terminal bad idea for region

By

Published:

 

The Port of Vancouver should seek new tenants that will create family-wage jobs in clean industries and not condemn our waterfront to become a transfer station for volatile Bakken shale crude oil, or the Columbia River Gorge to become a daily chute for several hundred potentially explosive railroad tank cars.

Our community is steadily moving away from the heavy industry that characterized the Columbia River waterfront, closing most of it to the public for decades. The future is exciting — a revitalized waterfront with residences, retail, offices, recreation, and light industry.

The incredible volume of explosive oil that would move through the scenic Gorge and past the billion-dollar waterfront development now under construction in downtown Vancouver, not to mention through neighborhoods from Vancouver to Stevenson, ought to cause us to rethink the wisdom of making a good portion of our waterfront Vancouver Energy’s 42-acre parking lot for oil trains. That particular piece of port property rightly should be used for a marine terminal, but not for oil.

It’s no secret that the railroad transports hazardous commodities through Vancouver daily. I oppose the exponential increase in shipments of explosive oil and, as a result, the exponentially greater potential for disaster.