Lucretius

Comment history

In Our View: More Bricks, Mortar

That second paragraph of mine above should have also read:

"Until the true nature of the problem is acknowledged, likely some years from now, there will be no solutions to the increasing number of problems appearing before us. We are in the beginning stages of the greatest economic contraction ever to have occurred, yet have a group of leaders so craven, so beholden to the expansion of the economy *they cannot reveal the truth to us that the expansion phase of America is likely over, and that changes in what now constitutes The American Dream are likely in order!*

May 31, 2011 at 3:41 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

In Our View: More Bricks, Mortar

Its BAU from the Infinite Growth Forever crowd, and a reflection of how complicit the media is in us *not* seeing the truth.

Until the true nature of the problem is acknowledged, likely some years from now, there will be no solutions to the increasing number of problems appearing before us. We are in the beginning stages of the greatest economic contraction ever to have occurred, yet have a group of leaders so craven, so beholden to the expansion of the economy

"A great many of the flailings and posturings that have defined American culture from the Eighties to the present, in other words, unfolded from what Jean-Paul Sartre called “bad faith” – the unspoken awareness, however frantically denied or repressed, that the things that actually mattered were not things anyone was willing to talk about, and that the solutions everyone wanted to discuss were not actually aimed at their putative targets. The lie at the heart of that bad faith was the desperate attempt to avoid facing the implications of the plain and utterly unwelcome fact that there is no way to make a middle class American lifestyle sustainable."

"Let’s repeat that, just for the sake of emphasis: *[there is no way to make a middle class American lifestyle sustainable][1]*."

And that, my friends, is the difficult and unwelcome truth of it, inconvenient though we may find it to be in the coming decades to our present lifestyle, as it withers and then vanishes in puff of automobile exhaust.

[1]: http://thearchdruidreport.blogspot.co...

May 31, 2011 at 3:30 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Financial aid doesn't stretch to help middle class

Until the nature of the problem is actually acknowledged, likely some years from now, there will be no solutions to the growing number of problems appearing before us. The Age of Industrial Growth is, by fits, starts and diminishments, coming to an end, and we're just now beginning to see the outline of The Great Contraction ahead. But expect to see little of the story here, in the mainstream media, until the problems become so pressing even they can no longer deny the fundamental changes that are in store for all of us who live the next couple of decades.

"A great many of the flailings and posturings that have defined American culture from the Eighties to the present, in other words, unfolded from what Jean-Paul Sartre called “bad faith” – the unspoken awareness, however frantically denied or repressed, that the things that actually mattered were not things anyone was willing to talk about, and that the solutions everyone wanted to discuss were not actually aimed at their putative targets. The lie at the heart of that bad faith was the desperate attempt to avoid facing the implications of the plain and utterly unwelcome fact that there is no way to make a middle class American lifestyle sustainable."

"Let’s repeat that, just for the sake of emphasis: *[there is no way to make a middle class American lifestyle sustainable.][1]*"

[1]: http://thearchdruidreport.blogspot.co...

May 31, 2011 at 11:23 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

In Our View: Help for Students

The programs described here seem to be a worthy, if inadequate, response to runaway costs in higher ed, but why isn't the harder question being asked of whether or not a higher education is today [worth what they are charging][1] for it?

Some of us think not, that [the burden may outweigh the benefits][2], but others will fight this notion, literally to the death. Regardless, the conversation will eventually get around to how overpriced some schools are today, and what changes toward a more sustainable business model will be needed in the years ahead.

[1]: http://money.cnn.com/2008/08/20/pf/co...
[2]: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/12/edu...

May 20, 2011 at 1:25 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

In Our View: Help for Students

Just be clear, artimus, I do agree wholeheartedly with you that, "Colleges need to cut their spending, trim their operations and lower tuition costs," and they will soon enough.

I just don't imagine that being a Republican or conservative or whatever you folks call yourselves these day has much to do with *these* particular goals. You people have shown yourselves to be as wasteful, extravagant, entitled and as resistent to meaningful change as the "opponents" you so ardently rail against.

Like Deep Throat so urgently urged the reporters, "follow the money" to find the truth. Just be prepared to discover the ugly truth that Americans are an exceedingly greedy, selfish lot, and very, very clever at the self-deception necessary to continue pretending we *aren't*.

May 20, 2011 at 12:44 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

In Our View: Help for Students

If you really think this is a moronic *liberal* problem, artimus, as versus a entrenched-interest administrator, educator, politician or bureaucrat problem, then they have **you** right where they want--imagining that this is a *partisan political* problem, as versus a much larger and difficult-to-resolve *systemic* problem.

Get the distinction? (The power elite are counting on you not being able to...)

May 20, 2011 at 12:28 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

In Our View: Help for Students

A good, if somewhat misleading opinion piece, in that there is, of course, an allusion to, but no real discussion of the massive higher education bubble that has been allowed to build in this country (and is, IMO, set to burst in the coming years), nor any consideration of whether or not even having a college degree makes economic sense today, in the deeply corrupted, contracting economic environment we are now all living in.

Please, for you and your children sake, understand that the world of education is quite different than just 10 years ago, consider well the idea that higher ed really is massively overpriced, and know that seemingly solid assumptions about future economic growth based on the past 30 or so years are little more than wishful thinking.

Educate *yourself*, by digging deeper than this article suggests you should, by reading such articles as [this one][1], [this][2], or [this][3] and think--no, study--very hard about what *really* constitutes a worthwhile education.

[1]: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/19/bus...
[2]: http://www.economist.com/blogs/schump...
[3]: http://www.usnews.com/education/blogs...

May 20, 2011 at 9:54 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Washington View: Tax amnesty a bright spot in otherwise dismal economy

Unfortunately Allen, I think you're right that we haven't begun to see the worst of it. And you won't read about it here until after the crash and panic, because the Powers That Be know that they have much to lose if the public were to lose its (misplaced) trust in the markets.

As with all such crashes, the money is already gone, lost forever in "unproductive works" (mostly, the pursuits of personal greed). The only real question now is will the rest of America realize this before the the power elites have transferred all of the bad debt now held by banks, hedge funds, investment and retirement accounts onto us, the taxpayers?

Even this, of course, won't stave off the disaster now approaching at a rapid pace, but it will make the power elites life a lot better down the road. Assuming there is still a road to be down on after this predicament has passed...

May 17, 2011 at 1:42 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Washington View: Tax amnesty a bright spot in otherwise dismal economy

No, Don, your bleating that "Washington’s economic recovery is stalled, and it won’t get better until lawmakers implement true tax and regulatory reforms" is little more than your typically self-(and paymaster) serving bullsh*t, designed to take advantage of the crisis we're now experiencing by propagandizing us into thinking that our so-called business leaders have even the slightest clue about what is best for an economy heading into a substantial depression, a depression that may change this country forever. The craven, small people that are our "leaders" have little to offer America other than their selfishly nuanced take on the efficacy of greed and the "infallibility of markets."

Here's more [actual evidence of the truth of what is happening to America today][1]. Read it and weep, but please, also turn off the mainstream media and dig beneath the surface to learn the truth of what is soon coming our way. Brace your family, your community and yourself for some very difficult years ahead...

[1]: http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/ar...

May 17, 2011 at 12:23 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Listen to Gresham, Hillsboro mayors

Oops, that bullet was meant to be a footnote...

May 15, 2011 at 8:56 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Previous