Cami Joner (Columbian Staff)

Comment history

Chuck's Produce moves beer, wine dept.

Cyberinkwaster, that's actually kind of humourous, though biting.

BTW, it's now mandatory for Columbian reporters to create Facebook Fan pages to interact with our readers. If you'd like to stay in touch, please visit my fan page at http://www.facebook.com/camijoner#!/c... and click the "like" button. And if you'd like to receive my daily, though sometimes sporadic, Tweets, you can follow me on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/#!/camijoner and I will follow, you, too.

Thanks very much in advance, Cami

May 26, 2011 at 4:30 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Vancouver Voice newspaper up for sale

Should have mentioned in the story that BizBuySell.com said the Voice distributes 15,000 free papers in Clark County.

By the way, it's now mandatory for Columbian reporters to create Facebook Fan pages to interact with our readers. If you'd like to stay in touch, please visit my fan page at http://www.facebook.com/camijoner#!/c... and click the "like" button. And if you'd like to receive my daily, though sometimes sporadic, Tweets, you can follow me on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/#!/camijoner and I will follow, you, too. Thanks very much in advance, Cami

May 26, 2011 at 12:31 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Fitness companies to open Vancouver office

P.S., Columbian reporters now have to create mandatory Facebook Fan pages to interact with our readers. If you'd like to stay in touch, please visit my page at http://www.facebook.com/camijoner#!/c... and click the "like" button. - C

May 26, 2011 at 12:25 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Fitness companies to open Vancouver office

Will do. Please remind me if I forget, and thanks. - C

May 26, 2011 at 12:20 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Clark County home values tumble

Thanks for all the comments. And just to correct one remark, the 2010 federal homebuyer’s tax credit gave first-time buyers an $8,000 tax refund and direct move-up buyers $6,500 if they signed a contract by April 30, 2010 and closed by the end of June 2010. Some of you could be right in predicting prices will continue to soften. Real estate folks are fond of saying we won't know we've hit bottom until prices start moving up again.

As for property taxes, the county assessors' office says the number we're taxed on is actually from value assessments taken the year before, so our 2011 tax bill is based on our 2010 value? (I think that's it). My colleague Stephanie Rice explained **[more about property taxes][1]** in this story published in February. Have a good weekend! - C

[1]: http://www.columbian.com/news/2011/fe...

May 13, 2011 at 10:17 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Economic development council chief to resign

holson, I'm just saying the "worthless" assessment might be a tad bit strong. The list of CREDC recruits came from an archived Columbian story, crediting the agency with: "Long-term development (that) included Sharp Corp.; Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., doing business as WaferTech in Camas; Kyocera Corp.; Linear Technology; (all businesses that are still here). It also said CREDC "assisted in the establishment of Washington State University Vancouver; and the retention of jobs at the Frito-Lay Corp. regional plant in west Vancouver." CREDC also was involved in efforts to attract and help small startups such as **[ClearAccess][1]**, which still operates here.

[1]: http://www.clearaccess.com/about-us/c...
[2]: http://twitter.com/#!/avatron
[3]: http://twitter.com/#!/georgedecarlo

May 3, 2011 at 5:02 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Economic development council chief to resign

Understand the criticism, given Clark County's prolonged period of high unemployment. However, just to add to the discussion I will say that in researching for this story, I found that Phillips and the CREDC actually have a decent track record in recruiting. The problem? Many of those businesses were not able to weather the recession. And so, as described in The Columbian's **[First Quarter Report][1]**, published on April 24, our economy has been running twice as fast just to stay in the same place.

Among companies the CREDC helped land and Clark County has since lost are: German civil engineering firm Bilfinger Berger, which opened an east Vancouver office in 2005 (or 2006) and closed it in 2007. Professional services sector recruits were: downtown Vancouver mortgage company Millennium Financial, which was going great guns until the mortgage meltdown. It closed in 2007 and laid off 150 people. Wells Fargo also opened its customer call center during Phillips' tenure. But employment numbers at the call center have always fluctuated. Wells Fargo announced a staff reduction of 68 employees in March, leaving 332 people presently reporting to work at the center.

On the other hand, it seems Phillips and the CREDC helped convince quite a few other companies to locate here or to stay, including SEH America, which employs nearly 850 people; C Tech, which employs 600 in four locations (including Camas), Kyocera Corp. and Linear Technology. The CREDC also is credited with helping Vancouver's Washington State University branch grow and helping retain jobs at Frito-Lay Corp.'s regional plant in west Vancouver.

[1]: http://www.columbian.com/news/2011/ap...

May 3, 2011 at 10:51 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Apartments may replace Burgerville

Rjscott, I think residents of Lewis & Clark Plaza park in the 558-space garage attached to the M.J. Murdock office building on C and Seventh streets, but I will check on it tomorrow.

April 21, 2011 at 5:10 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Apartments may replace Burgerville

Here is a link for readers who missed our March 4 story about **[Burgerville's plans to close the downtown restaurant][1]**. The company's chief cultural officer Jack Graves said the 1962 cinderblock building was basically obsolete by the 1970s, with the advent of the drive-through. But he said the downtown site would not accommodate a drive-up window.

Take heart DenMark, Graves also said the company is actively seeking another downtown site. (I'm with you - totally love Burgerville - who doesn't?)

For those of you who subscribe to the print paper, today's edition featured a "Print Only" story by my colleague Erin Middlewood about a group of 1980s Hudson’s Bay High School graduates who converged on downtown Vancouver’s Burgerville to "revel in nostalgia and special sauce."

Bet a lot of us have similar stories. - C

- C

[1]: http://www.columbian.com/news/2011/ma...

April 21, 2011 at 4:39 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Apartments may replace Burgerville

E_terrific, It also appears parts of downtown have building height restrictions, according to a story by former city reporter Jeffrey Mize, published in June 2007. That's when the city council approved a redevelopment plan - the Vancouver City Center Vision Plan - for a 130-block area downtown from the Columbia River north to Fourth Plain Boulevard. City officials and downtown developers spent three years crafting the plan, to help downtown "retain its historic character" as it redevelops. The plan also included the rezoning of the former Boise Cascade industrial site.

Seems there was quite a discussion on building heights, so the group hired local architectural firm Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership to do a three-month study (for $5,000). The council decided, according to Jeff's story, "taller buildings along Main Street (would) have a 'step back, step up' design where the building's lower floors extend out to the sidewalk and its upper floors are pushed back from the sidewalk, a design feature that was incorporated into the Hilton Vancouver Washington." Mize wrote, "'Step back, step up' prevents larger new buildings from overwhelming smaller existing structures. Pedestrians can see a diverse cityscape as they walk on sidewalks, and daylight can reach street level to brighten the urban environment."

Mize wrote, "Vancouver proposes that new buildings be no taller than 45 feet along Main Street, from Fifth Street to slightly north of 11th Street (so, not quite as far north as Kassab's development) However, if upper floors are set back 15 feet, buildings can rise to 100 feet with Federal Aviation Administration approval (to accommodate Pearson Field). By comparison, the West Coast Bank building on Broadway is 100 feet tall, according to the Emporis Buildings, a Web site that serves the building industry. Smith Tower (the round building) on Washington Street tops out at 158 feet." - C

April 21, 2011 at 9:26 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Previous