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Tuesday,  July 23 , 2024

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Photo of Dameon Pesanti

Stories by Dameon Pesanti

Columbian staff writer

Eden Stahley, 9, leans over a snow-covered fence to look into a marsh at Mount Vista near WSU Vancouver, Monday morning, February 19, 2018. Stahley and her two sisters were enjoying the few inches of snow by sledding together on a hill near their home.

Cold weather and more snow in the forecast for Clark County

Eden Stahley, 9, leans over a snow-covered fence to look into a marsh at Mount Vista near WSU Vancouver, Monday morning, February 19, 2018. Stahley and her two sisters were enjoying the few inches of snow by sledding together on a hill near their home.

February 19, 2018, 4:18pm Clark County News

With cold temperatures and a little snow, it actually felt like a real winter in the lower elevations of Southwest Washington on Monday morning, and the National Weather Service said the weather could continue that way into the rest of the week. Read story

Nathaniel Baker, 19, of Vancouver, waits for the bus Friday on Mill Plain Boulevard near the intersection of Southeast 136th Avenue. C-Tran is working to develop a Mill Plain Boulevard Bus Rapid Transit corridor.

C-Tran gets rolling on design of Mill Plain rapid transit line

Nathaniel Baker, 19, of Vancouver, waits for the bus Friday on Mill Plain Boulevard near the intersection of Southeast 136th Avenue. C-Tran is working to develop a Mill Plain Boulevard Bus Rapid Transit corridor.

February 16, 2018, 7:42pm Clark County News

A little more than a year after The Vine began rolling through Vancouver, C-Tran is taking steps to bring another bus rapid transit line to the city, this time on Mill Plain Boulevard. Read story

A C-Tran bus is seen in July from an empty field at Fisher's Landing Transit Center, where C-Tran is planning to build a new transit-oriented development.

C-Tran envisions a bustling Fisher’s Landing

A C-Tran bus is seen in July from an empty field at Fisher's Landing Transit Center, where C-Tran is planning to build a new transit-oriented development.

February 15, 2018, 8:16pm Clark County News

Today, the Fisher’s Landing Transit Center is a place to leave your car and catch a bus as part of the regular commute, but proposed changes at the site could give C-Tran riders a suite of reasons to stick around. Read story

Shalaine Mistretta of Portland and her dog, Everest, walk along the upper section of the Cape Horn Trail. For years, the lower portion of the trail has seasonally closed to protect nesting peregrine falcons. Now a conservation organization is working to see the lower portion of the trail temporarily opened year round to hikers to see if birds and people can coexist peacefully, but the move is proving controversial among bird advocates. At top, signs at the entrance to the Cape Horn Trail remind hikers to be respectful of wildlife.

Feathers fly over pitch to reopen Lower Cape Horn Trail

Shalaine Mistretta of Portland and her dog, Everest, walk along the upper section of the Cape Horn Trail. For years, the lower portion of the trail has seasonally closed to protect nesting peregrine falcons. Now a conservation organization is working to see the lower portion of the trail temporarily opened year round to hikers to see if birds and people can coexist peacefully, but the move is proving controversial among bird advocates. At top, signs at the entrance to the Cape Horn Trail remind hikers to be respectful of wildlife.

February 15, 2018, 6:52pm Clark County News

A hiking organization’s efforts to convince the U.S. Forest Service to at least temporarily end a nearly decade-long policy of closing the Lower Cape Horn Trail during peregrine falcon nesting season has alarmed biologists at the Audubon Society of Portland. Read story

Julann Spromberg, a research toxicologist with Ocean Associates Inc., working under contract with NOAA Fisheries, observes a salmon placed in a tank of clear water Oct. 20, 2014after it died from four hours of exposure to unfiltered highway runoff water.  A study by researchers at Washington State University Vancouver found that stormwater is more harmful to fish than perviously thought, according to a study released Monday. (AP Photo/Ted S.

Study finds more harm to fish from stormwater

Julann Spromberg, a research toxicologist with Ocean Associates Inc., working under contract with NOAA Fisheries, observes a salmon placed in a tank of clear water Oct. 20, 2014after it died from four hours of exposure to unfiltered highway runoff water.  A study by researchers at Washington State University Vancouver found that stormwater is more harmful to fish than perviously thought, according to a study released Monday. (AP Photo/Ted S.

February 12, 2018, 6:04am Clark County News

A few years ago, scientists discovered that stormwater, a potentially toxic mixture of lawn fertilizers, brake-pad dust and other pollutants, can kill salmon. Read story

Campaign signs for Port of Vancouver District 1 commission candidates Kris Greene and Don Orange sit at the intersection of Northwest 78th Street and Northwest Lakeshore Avenue. Greene’s former campaign strategist claims energy industry insiders wield a heavy influence in Greene’s election campaign.

State House passes bill limiting contributions in port campaigns

Campaign signs for Port of Vancouver District 1 commission candidates Kris Greene and Don Orange sit at the intersection of Northwest 78th Street and Northwest Lakeshore Avenue. Greene’s former campaign strategist claims energy industry insiders wield a heavy influence in Greene’s election campaign.

February 11, 2018, 5:13pm Clark County News

A bill that would limit campaign contributions in port commission elections is moving to the state Senate after passing the House with near-unanimous approval. Read story

Sena Blevins and her dog, Kirra, takes in sweeping views of the Columbia River Gorge at the Cape Horn Lookout along state Highway 14. The U.S. Forest Service and the Columbia River Gorge Commission are now mulling changes to the Gorge’s National Scenic Area management plan that could have lasting implications for Gorge recreation enthusiasts and residents alike.

Land managers work on update to Gorge’s management plan

Sena Blevins and her dog, Kirra, takes in sweeping views of the Columbia River Gorge at the Cape Horn Lookout along state Highway 14. The U.S. Forest Service and the Columbia River Gorge Commission are now mulling changes to the Gorge’s National Scenic Area management plan that could have lasting implications for Gorge recreation enthusiasts and residents alike.

February 8, 2018, 7:41pm Clark County News

Land managers are conducting an overdue multi-year review and revision of the management plan for the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Read story

This 2005 photo looks west from Forest Road 26 northeast of Spirit Lake toward Goat Mountain, the area where Ascot USA Inc. wants to drill exploratory holes to study the possibility of mining for minerals such as copper, gold and molybdenum. The U.S. Forest Service has given its consent to allow the exploratory mining near Mount St. Helens.

Exploratory mining approved at area near Mount St. Helens

This 2005 photo looks west from Forest Road 26 northeast of Spirit Lake toward Goat Mountain, the area where Ascot USA Inc. wants to drill exploratory holes to study the possibility of mining for minerals such as copper, gold and molybdenum. The U.S. Forest Service has given its consent to allow the exploratory mining near Mount St. Helens.

February 8, 2018, 7:29pm Clark County News

The U.S. Forest Service has given its consent to allow exploratory mining near Mount St. Helens. Read story

(iStock.com)

Clark County residents use more water than U.S. average

(iStock.com)

February 7, 2018, 8:24pm Clark County News

Keeping with a long-running trend, Clark County residents are using less water on a daily basis than they have in years past. But they’re still using more than the average American. Read story

BNSF Railway will spend $160 million making upgrades and performing maintenance around the state of Washington this year. In the last five years, the company has put roughly $940 million into upgrading and improving its rail network around the state.

BNSF plans $160M in upgrades

BNSF Railway will spend $160 million making upgrades and performing maintenance around the state of Washington this year. In the last five years, the company has put roughly $940 million into upgrading and improving its rail network around the state.

February 7, 2018, 5:12pm Business

BNSF Railway Co. plans to make $160 million in infrastructure upgrades in the state this year, with many of those either having already occurred or occurring in upcoming months around Southwest Washington. Read story