Friday, August 19, 2022
Aug. 19, 2022

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Clark County business briefing

By , Columbian staff writer
Published:

People in Business

Dan Foster and Foster Wealth Advisors has added Lisa Chabert as a financial advisor in the Vancouver office, 15609 S.E. Mill Plain Blvd. Chabert will be part of Foster Wealth Advisors, a private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Friends of the Carpenter has hired Jim Gutierrez as part-time manager of the 2nd Chance Thrift Store, which has been run solely by volunteers since opening in 2010. The store, 3414 N.E. 52nd St. in the Minnehaha area in Vancouver, financially supports the ministries of the nonprofit Friends of the Carpenter.

Frito-Lay over-the-road driver Edward Laramee of Vancouver was one of 78 drivers recognized company-wide who have reached the career milestone of driving more than 1 to 3 million accident-free miles. Laramee has driven a total of 1,015,988 safe miles and has been with Frito-Lay for 15 years. The Million Milers, along with their families, were recognized at the company’s annual gala in Fort Worth, Texas.

Restaurateur Mark Matthias has hired Sunny Golden to handle event planning and catering for Warehouse 1923, a new venue planned for the former Red Lion at the Quay location. Golden has more than 10 years of experience in the hospitality industry, most recently as senior catering manager at the Hilton Vancouver Washington.

New Business

Tumtum Pilates has opened at 1436 A St., Suite 206 in Washougal. Owner and instructor Annice Kessler offers private and semi-private sessions by appointment. Information: 213-300-3468 or www.tumtumpilates.com


The Columbian welcomes submissions about Clark County residents or businesses, as well as regional business events. Information must be received by noon of the Tuesday preceding the intended Sunday publication date. Send to kay.richardson@columbian.com or fax 360-735-4491. Sales awards are not published.

Columbian staff writer

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