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Aug. 7, 2022

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Vancouver Farmers Market to relocate

Market to keep spot on park, move from West Sixth Street to West Eighth Street

By , Columbian politics reporter
Published:
3 Photos
The Vancouver Farmers Market will celebrate its 30th year in a new location. The market will shift from West Sixth Street to West Eighth Street and remain on Esther Street.
The Vancouver Farmers Market will celebrate its 30th year in a new location. The market will shift from West Sixth Street to West Eighth Street and remain on Esther Street. (Steve Dipaola for The Columbian) Photo Gallery

The Vancouver Farmers Market is celebrating its 30th anniversary in an unexpected way — with a move.

But as the market’s Executive Director Jordan Boldt describes it, it’s more of a pivot than a move.

The market will keep its spot on Esther Street abutting Esther Short Park, but will relocate from West Sixth Street to West Eighth Street.

Boldt said the city initially approached the market in September, following the opening of the Vancouver Waterfront Park with concerns the market would block access during the summer.

With looming summer construction complicating the situation, it was decided it would be better for everyone involved if the market relocated.

“The market’s perspective is obviously it’s never an easy thing to undertake, but we’re pretty optimistic,” Boldt said. “We think the new space is going to actually be better for the market.”

Eighth Street does have a drawback, however. The street isn’t as wide as Sixth Street, meaning the market can’t set up three rows of vendors. Eighth Street is only wide enough for two rows.

“We had to elongate the market a little bit to make up for the extra space,” he said. The market will form a “T” and move up and down Eighth Street.

Elongating has its benefits, it turns out. There’s room for an additional five vendors.

Boldt said it’s unclear if the move is temporary or permanent.

“Moving a market is a pretty big undertaking, it requires notice to neighbors and businesses and rerouting traffic,” he said. “Shutting down traffic with the market being where it was, people had adapted to that.”

Access to downtown shouldn’t be impacted too much, Boldt added, drivers will just need to learn new opportunities for rerouting.

“As people learn, it’ll be fine,” he said.

The biggest challenge will be to vendors and those market regulars, who will need to adjust to new spaces and a new layout.

“It’s not something we want to do on a whim but definitely something we’re able to do,” Boldt said. “I’m really excited for people to re-experience the market.”

Even though the relocation was unexpected, Boldt said it’s reassuring to have the backing and support of the city.

“Sometimes you just have to adjust to the city you’re a part of,” he said.

Columbian politics reporter

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