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#MeToo doc explores experience of women of color

It may have been plagued with controversy after Oprah Winfrey pulled out as executive producer, but “On the Record” has moved on

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FILE - In this Jan. 26, 2020 file photo, Sil Lai Abrams, back row from left, director Amy Ziering, director Kirby Dick, Drew Dixon, seated left, and Sheri Hines pose for a portrait to promote the film "On the Record" at the Music Lodge during the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. The film provides an intimate portrayal of the agonizing process of calculating whether to go public with harassment and abuse claims.
FILE - In this Jan. 26, 2020 file photo, Sil Lai Abrams, back row from left, director Amy Ziering, director Kirby Dick, Drew Dixon, seated left, and Sheri Hines pose for a portrait to promote the film "On the Record" at the Music Lodge during the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. The film provides an intimate portrayal of the agonizing process of calculating whether to go public with harassment and abuse claims. (Photo by Taylor Jewell/Invision/AP, File) Photo Gallery

There’s an elegant, almost poetic silence to one of the most compelling scenes of “On the Record,” a powerful new documentary about sexual violence that knows just when to dial down to a hushed quiet.

In the early morning darkness of Dec. 13, 2017, former music executive Drew Dixon walks to a coffee shop and buys the New York Times. On the front page is the story in which she and two others accuse the powerful hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons, her former boss, of rape. Dixon examines the article, carefully folds the paper back up, puts on a wool cap as if for protection — and crumples into silent tears.

They are tears of fear, surely, about the ramifications of going public — but also, clearly, relief. It feels as if the poison of a decades-old toxic secret is literally seeping out of her.

“It saved my life,” she now says of that decision.

“On the Record,” by Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering, provides an intimate portrayal of the agonizing process of calculating whether to go public. Beyond that, it shines an overdue light on the music industry.

Most importantly, it puts a spotlight on women of color, and the unique and painful burden they often face in coming forward.

The project also has been associated with controversy, of course, due to Oprah Winfrey’s well-documented withdrawal as executive producer just before the Sundance Film Festival, scuttling a distribution deal with Apple. Winfrey later acknowledged Simmons had called her and waged a pressure campaign, but said that wasn’t why she bailed.

But the film has moved on. It opened at Sundance anyway to cheers and two emotional standing ovations, and was soon picked up by HBO Max, where it premieres Wednesday.

For Dixon, vindication at Sundance was sweet.

“Just standing there, on our own, and realizing that we were enough,” she said in an interview last week along with Abrams and accuser Sherri Hines, of the premiere. “That our courage was enough. That none of us waffled. None of us buckled. That we were strong enough to defend ourselves and each other.”

Less than two years earlier, Dixon had been plagued by doubt. She’d expected that the film, which began shooting before she decided to go public, would be a general look at #MeToo and the music industry. But then the directors wanted to focus more on her journey.

“The idea of being blackballed by the black community was really scary,” she says. “But I also felt this pressure, this responsibility to be brave, to highlight the experience of black women as survivors. The opportunity might never come again.”

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