Thursday, November 26, 2020
Nov. 26, 2020

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Working in Clark County: Daniel Monroe, psychic medium

By , Columbian Staff writer, news assistant
Published:
8 Photos
Daniel Monroe, 23, who works as a psychic medium in downtown Vancouver, wraps a couch in plastic that has been sanitized to protect against COVID-19 while preparing for an in-person client on a recent weekday. Monroe, who wears a mask during in-person sessions, also sees clients via Zoom.
Daniel Monroe, 23, who works as a psychic medium in downtown Vancouver, wraps a couch in plastic that has been sanitized to protect against COVID-19 while preparing for an in-person client on a recent weekday. Monroe, who wears a mask during in-person sessions, also sees clients via Zoom. (Photos by amanda cowan/The Columbian) Photo Gallery

Jobs that involve communicating with dead people and telling futures has a market size of $2 billion in America, according to the website IBISWorld. Nonetheless, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the government’s main source for data about jobs, does not track any information about psychic services.

Clairvoyance is a “power” that people have claimed to possess for centuries — and people have been trying to debunk them for just as long. Even now, despite much medical and scientific advancement in society, people still seek it out. According to a 2018 study by the Pew Research Center, 4 in 10 American adults believe in psychics.

However, it’s a controversial job that many see as a con. Last year, on HBO’s “Last Week Tonight,” John Oliver ripped into the industry in one segment, calling it “a vast underworld of unscrupulous vultures.”

“For anyone who does believe in psychic powers, I know there is nothing I could say that could convince you otherwise,” Oliver said to his nearly 1 million viewers. “Logic isn’t the reason that you believe in them, and it won’t be the reason that you stop.”

Daniel Monroe, 23, who grew up in Yacolt, doesn’t care about the naysayers. He’s been working as a psychic in the area for about seven years, with enough revenue to operate out of a small office in Clark County’s ARTS Building downtown. While COVID-19 has impacted his larger events, such as shows at the Kiggins, Monroe continues to have clients at his office and some over Zoom.

Daniel Monroe

1104 Main St., Suite P4, Vancouver.

www.mediumdanielmonroe.com

Revenue: Undisclosed.

Number of employees: 2.

Bureau of Labor Statistics job outlook: Not available.

He said he’s had clients of all sorts come to him for guidance, including local nurses and police officers.

The Columbian caught up with Monroe to learn more.

Tell me about yourself.

I grew up in Yacolt, so 30 minutes into the woods. I went to Prairie High School, then did the rest online. But I grew up obviously different. I would randomly pass out and have to go to doctors. It happened more when I was in middle school. I had a heart monitor on me; I went to specialists. They couldn’t find anything wrong. So I moved out at the age of 17 and when I did, I did a lot of looking into being empathic and what exactly that meant. It just meant I could feel intense emotions and energy. Come to find out it was a spirit trying to communicate with me.

Can you describe what it is that you do?

I’m able to connect with departed loved ones on the other side. (I) help people on this side going through grief and loss and have unanswered questions, I also can help those on the other side. I can communicate with people who had a drinking issue or were abusive; they get to see how their actions affected people and can come through and apologize. I guess bring healing here and bring healing there.

A lot of people think what you’re doing is a sham. What are your thoughts on that?

So, that’s why I do all sorts of different showcases. Doing the live events isn’t about the money. It’s called “demonstration” in my industry. We’re demonstrating that again it’s OK to connect with your loved ones. For those people who want to bring their husbands or wives who are skeptical: the thing is the information that comes forward, you can sit here and Google names — that’s not what I do, just so we’re clear. It’s bringing forward their essence and energy and things you can’t Google.

WORKING IN CLARK COUNTY

Working in Clark County, a brief profile of interesting Clark County business owners or a worker in the public, private, or nonprofit sector. Send ideas to Lyndsey Hewitt: lyndsey.hewitt@columbian.com; fax 360-735-4598; phone 360-735-4550.

What are your hopes for your future?

I always say that I have two separate goals. One of them is obviously bringing mediumship as somewhat normal and accepted. But also being gay, for that to be more open and accepted. I do wear makeup and heels and things like that. That’s the goal business-wise and making the LGBTQ community more accepted, especially on this side of town.

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