Monday, May 10, 2021
May 10, 2021

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Closed by COVID-19, North Clark County museum reopens

By , Columbian county government and small cities reporter
Published:
6 Photos
Quilts line the pews on Saturday at the North Clark Historical Museum in Amboy. This quilt pictured was recently donated by 101-year-old Elaine Fletcher. Her mother crafted the mostly finished quilt; a needle was found in the unfinished binding.
Quilts line the pews on Saturday at the North Clark Historical Museum in Amboy. This quilt pictured was recently donated by 101-year-old Elaine Fletcher. Her mother crafted the mostly finished quilt; a needle was found in the unfinished binding. (Joshua Hart/The Columbian Photo Gallery

AMBOY — Scores of North Clark County historical items are open again for public view.

The North Clark Historical Museum in Amboy, 21416 N.E. 399th St., has been closed for most of the past year due to COVID-19. But the museum reopened Saturday in limited time windows.

The museum has two floors, with some large exhibits outside. It’s set inside what used to be the United Brethren Church, which opened in 1910 and closed in 1966.

A group of volunteers took possession of the church, which had become dilapidated, in 1988. Following a 12-year remodeling effort, the museum opened in 2000.

“The building itself is probably our best exhibit,” said Jim Malinowski, president of the museum’s Board of Directors.

The pandemic closure nixed opportunities to commemorate the 110th anniversary of the church opening and 20th anniversary of the museum’s unveiling.

“We’ve been able to have a few little things, but not a whole lot,” said Georgene Neal, secretary of the museum board.

The museum doesn’t charge entry fees; it relies on donations.

It also hosts an annual quilt raffle in which contestants, for $1 tickets, can win a quilt made by the Chelatchie Quilters. This year’s quilt, “Prairie Sampler,” is hanging near the front of the museum. The winner will be announced around Veterans’ Day.

Beyond that is a substantial collection of north county history, including photos of the Mount St. Helens eruption, informational displays about historical events such as the Yacolt Burn, the original Amboy School bell – dated 1906 – a model sawmill and a 19th-century clock.

Pews in the main area of the buildings are ordered as they would be for a church service. Mannequins dressed in historical garb sit in the pews, appearing as if they’re waiting for a service.

Typically open each Saturday, the museum, for now, will be open on the second and fourth Saturdays of each month from noon to 4 p.m., with COVID-19 safety measures in place. The museum will be open on more Saturdays as it regains volunteers.

More information is available at 360-247-5800 or museumnch88@gmail.com.

“Last year was pretty hard on us,” Neal said, taking a deep breath and adjusting her facemask. “But we’re moving forward.”

Columbian county government and small cities reporter
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