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Oct. 25, 2021

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U.S.-French spat seems to simmer down

Tempers cool after submarine deal caused outrage

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FILE - In this June 14, 2021 file photo, U.S. President Joe Biden, right, speaks with French President Emmanuel Macron during a plenary session during a NATO summit at NATO headquarters in Brussels. French President Emmanuel Macron expects "clarifications and clear commitments" from President Joe Biden in a call to be held later on Wednesday to address the submarines' dispute, Macron's office said.
FILE - In this June 14, 2021 file photo, U.S. President Joe Biden, right, speaks with French President Emmanuel Macron during a plenary session during a NATO summit at NATO headquarters in Brussels. French President Emmanuel Macron expects "clarifications and clear commitments" from President Joe Biden in a call to be held later on Wednesday to address the submarines' dispute, Macron's office said. (Brendan Smialowski, Pool via AP, File) Photo Gallery

PARIS — The most significant rift in decades between the United States and France seemed on the mend Wednesday after French President Emmanuel Macron and President Joe Biden got on the phone Wednesday to smooth things over.

In a half-hour call that the White House described as “friendly,” the two leaders agreed to meet next month to discuss the way forward after the French fiercely objected when the U.S., Australia and Britain announced a new Indo-Pacific defense deal last week that cost the French a submarine contract worth billions. France also agreed to send its ambassador back to Washington.

The White House made a point of releasing a photograph of Biden smiling during his call with Macron.

In a carefully crafted joint statement, the two governments said Biden and Macron “have decided to open a process of in-depth consultations, aimed at creating the conditions for ensuring confidence.”

So did Biden apologize?

White House press secretary Jen Psaki sidestepped the question repeatedly, allowing that Biden did acknowledge “there could have been greater consultation.”

“The president is hopeful this is a step in returning to normal in a long, important, abiding relationship that the United States has with France,” she said.

The call suggested a cooling of tempers after days of outrage from Paris directed at the Biden administration.

In an unprecedented move, France last week recalled its ambassadors to the United States and Australia to protest what the French said amounted to a stab in the back by allies. As part of the defense pact, Australia will cancel a multibillion-dollar contract to buy diesel-electric French submarines and acquire U.S. nuclear-powered vessels instead.

It was clear there is still repair work to be done.

The joint statement said the French ambassador will “have intensive work with senior U.S. officials” upon his return to the United States.

Biden and Macron agreed “that the situation would have benefitted from open consultations among allies on matters of strategic interest to France and our European partners,” the statement said.

Biden reaffirmed in the statement “the strategic importance of French and European engagement in the Indo-Pacific region.”

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