Friday, August 19, 2022
Aug. 19, 2022

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Nonprofit seeks help with Idaho trails

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BOISE, Idaho — It’s definitely that time of year to get outside — well, maybe once it’s not 100 degrees — whether it’s fishing, water skiing, hiking the Boise Foothills or biking the Greenbelt.

Recreational activities are a pretty big deal around here.

Idaho has around 1,400 trails, according to alltrails.com. That gives hikers, backpackers, mountain bikers and climbers endless opportunities for hours of fun as far as outdoor adventures are concerned.

In addition, it takes countless hours of work to maintain these trails so they can be utilized and enjoyed by nature lovers.

There just isn’t enough funding available for the upkeep, unfortunately, which is why the Idaho Trails Association was formed in 2010. With the help of volunteers, organizations and government partners, the nonprofit works to “preserve Idaho’s incredible trail system through education, maintenance projects, and public lands advocacy,” according to a news release.

And it needs a lot of helping hands.

So for those enthusiastic about keeping trails well-maintained, ITA has more than 60 projects planned throughout Idaho that are in need of volunteers.

Three of them, according to the release, are:

  • July 16: Hawkins Reserve Trail Construction. “In partnership with Ridge to Rivers, volunteers will construct a new trail on the Hawkins Range Reserve in the Boise Foothills.”
  • Aug. 14-20: Ten Mile Creek. “Volunteers will spend a week in the beautiful Gospel Hump Wilderness backpacking and working on trails.”
  • Aug. 27-28: Nez Perce Peak. “This weekend project promises great views of both the Selway Bitterroot Wilderness and the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.”

No experience is necessary and all levels of hikers are welcome. Tools and training will be provided as well.

To sign up for a project or to view the entire schedule, go to idahotrailsassociation.org/projects.

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