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June 30, 2022

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Fishing report: Washington Free Fishing Weekend tradition continues June 11-12

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Anglers across the state will be able to fish without a license this weekend, June 11-12, during Washington’s annual Free Fishing Weekend event.

Residents and non-residents can fish or harvest shellfish across the state on those days, in any waters open to fishing, all without a license.

Other rules such as seasons, size limits, daily limits, and area closures are still in effect. For example, Puget Sound crabbing is not currently open, as well as clam and oyster seasons on many beaches.

During Free Fishing Weekend, visitors are not required to display a Vehicle Access Pass or Discover Pass for day-use visits to a Washington state park or to lands managed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources or WDFW.

Interested anglers should be sure to check the current fishing regulations valid through the end of June before hitting the water, as well as any emergency rules currently in effect.

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Fishery reports

Sampling summary for May 30-June 5:

MAINSTEM COLUMBIA RIVER

SALMON/STEELHEAD

Sec 1 (Bonneville) — 258 bank anglers kept 29 Chinook, four jacks and released 27 Chinook and two jacks.

Sec 2 (Camas/Washougal) — 17 boats/33 rods kept three Chinook, one jack and released one jack.

Sec 3 (Interstate 5 area) — 14 bank anglers had no catch; three boats/four rods had no catch.

Sec 4 (Vancouver) — 154 bank anglers kept six Chinook, three jacks and released three Chinook; 83 boats/154 rods kept 24 Chinook, seven jacks and released 14 Chinook.

Sec 5 (Woodland) — 57 bank anglers kept 10 Chinook and released one jack; 24 boats/51 rods kept four Chinook, three jacks and released four Chinook.

Sec 6 (Kalama) — 113 bank anglers kept eight Chinook, one jack, one steelhead and released nine Chinook; 32 boats/74 rods kept 14 Chinook and released three Chinook.

Sec 7 (Cowlitz) — Four boats/12 rods kept three Chinook, one jack and released one Chinook.

Sec 8 (Longview) — 116 bank anglers kept 12 Chinook, two jacks, seven steelhead and released two Chinook, one steelhead and seven sockeye; 100 boats/225 rods kept 48 Chinook, five jacks, 18 steelhead and released 19 Chinook, one jack and three sockeye.

Sec 9 (Cathlamet) — 34 bank anglers kept one Chinook, seven steelhead and released one steelhead; 10 boats/23 rods kept three Chinook, three steelhead and released one Chinook.

Sec 10 (Cathlamet) — Two bank anglers had no catch; 12 boats/24 rods kept six Chinook, one jack, eight steelhead and released two Chinook.

STURGEON

Sec 5 (Woodland) — One boat/five rods released five legal and one oversize sturgeon.

Sec 9 (Cathlamet) — 10 boats/29 rods kept four legal and released four sublegal and eight oversize sturgeon.

Sec 10 (Chinook/Deep River/Cathlamet) — 15 bank anglers had no catch; 152 boats/435 rods kept 58 legal and released 71 sublegal and 110 oversize sturgeon.

SHAD

Sec 1 (Bonneville) — 54 bank anglers kept 345 shad and released two shad.

Sec 2 (Camas/Washougal) — Two boats/four rods kept 55 shad.

Sec 4 (Vancouver) — Two bank anglers kept two shad; three boats/five rods kept 19 shad.

Sec 5 (Woodland) — Three boats/seven rods kept 84 shad.

Sec 6 (Kalama) — Three boats/seven rods kept 58 shad.

Sec 8 (Longview) — Three boats/nine rods kept 13 shad.

COLUMBIA RIVER TRIBUTARIES

SALMON/STEELHEAD

Cowlitz River from Interstate 5 Bridge downstream — 22 bank rods had no catch; one boat/four rods had no catch.

Cowlitz River Above the I-5 Bridge — 15 bank rods had no catch.

Kalama River — 33 bank rods kept two Chinook, two steelhead and released one jack and one steelhead; four boats/11 rods kept three steelhead and released one steelhead.

Lewis River — 17 bank rods had no catch; one boat/two rods kept two Chinook.

Wind River — Six bank rods had no catch; three boats/five rods released two Chinook.

Drano Lake — 11 boats/32 rods kept one Chinook and released one Chinook.

Klickitat River below Fisher Hill Bridge — Nine bank rods kept one Chinook and one jack.

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