Friday, August 19, 2022
Aug. 19, 2022

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Clark County heats up

Hot weather not expected to stick around like last year’s heat wave

By , Columbian staff writer
Published:
3 Photos
Vancouver kids Addy Bugge, 3, from left, joins Elizabeth White Eyes, 7, and Kai Sabanovic, 6, to beat the heat in the water feature at The Waterfront Vancouver on Monday afternoon. Forecasters predict cooler weather on the way.
Vancouver kids Addy Bugge, 3, from left, joins Elizabeth White Eyes, 7, and Kai Sabanovic, 6, to beat the heat in the water feature at The Waterfront Vancouver on Monday afternoon. Forecasters predict cooler weather on the way. (Amanda Cowan/The Columbian) Photo Gallery

After weeks of on-and-off rain, the Pacific Northwest finally has some heat.

Although it didn’t reach 100, Clinton Rockey with the National Weather Service in Portland said that the Pacific Northwest had a lot of hot temperatures this weekend, ranging from around 98 to 99 degrees, even on the coast.

“The coast was pretty warm for awhile,” Rockey said. “That was quite unique.”

The hot weather won’t be sticking around for long, unlike 2021’s long-lasting and brutal heat wave.

“Last year was a very unique situation. It’s one of those rare ones that had to come through very often that did not disappear,” he said. “That’s not going to happen this time.”

IQ Air reported Monday that the air quality index in Vancouver was 58, which is considered a moderate air pollution level. The main air pollutant is PM2.5, tiny particles in the air that reduce visibility and cause the air to become hazy. Vancouver is currently at 3.1 times the World Health Organization’s annual air quality guideline value.

At times when air quality is poor, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends closing windows to avoid dirty outdoor air and reducing outdoor exercise. At high temperatures, the CDC also recommends staying in air-conditioned locations as much as possible, drinking fluids and preparing for outdoor activity by wearing sunscreen and loose clothing.

Rockey said that the temperatures will be much cooler in the evenings this week, with clouds and some showers possible on the weekend.

As the Monday July 4 holiday approaches, Rockey said the weather will turn pleasant, with temperatures somewhere in the low to mid-70s with a mix of sun and clouds.

“At this point, it’s going to be a pretty nice Fourth,” Rockey said.

The Pacific Northwest might get more of these hot weekends throughout July.

“I suspect we’ll get more of these into the middle part of July as the pattern changes again and we’ll get more of our classic summer warm back,” Rockey said. “But at least for the next week or two there doesn’t appear to be any big heat waves on the horizon.”

Charlene Welch, development and communications director with Council for the Homeless, urges community members to carry water bottles with them to provide to people in need. Those who need emergency shelter or housing assistance can call the Council for the Homeless at 360-695-9677.

Those who are still in need of cooling centers to escape the heat can check out the Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency database for Clark County cooling centers.

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