Wednesday, May 25, 2022
May 25, 2022

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Pop-up doughnut shop puts down roots in Camas

Next Dough Neighbor gets new owner, permanent space downtown

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Next Dough Neighbor owner Matthew Schultz used proceeds from closing out his shoe-importing business to buy the pop-up business from Josh and Ashley Grossman and create a doughnut shop in downtown Camas.
Next Dough Neighbor owner Matthew Schultz used proceeds from closing out his shoe-importing business to buy the pop-up business from Josh and Ashley Grossman and create a doughnut shop in downtown Camas. (Taylor Balkom/The Columbian) Photo Gallery

Popular doughnut pop-up Next Dough Neighbor has a new owner and a permanent space in downtown Camas in the spot that previously housed Goji Grill. Owner Matt Schultz hopes to open by late May or June.

Schultz bought the business from founders Josh and Ashley Grossman. Schultz, who moved to Camas in 2018, saw Josh Grossman’s video appeal to the community for investors at a time when he was looking for a new business venture.

Schultz has imported and sold shoes from England for the past 10 years. The pandemic wiped out operations at the overseas factory for a year and ultimately led to the shutdown of his company. Schultz sold off his inventory and used the proceeds to invest in this new doughnut business.

“I have capital, I can run a business, and I was a financial analyst,” said Schultz. “I just don’t know anything about doughnuts, so it was a good partnership.”

Josh and Ashley Grossman sold to Schultz, but they still influence the business. Sixty doughnut recipes developed for their scratch-made yeast doughnuts will be available in the shop in increments of six to eight at a time. Ashley Grossman still helps with Next Dough Neighbor’s social media.

In addition to the deluxe treats created by the Grossmans, Schultz will sell standard doughnuts as well as custom roasted coffee at the shop, 412 N.E. Fourth Ave. Eventually, cookies, cakes, pies, and ice cream will be added. After the shop opens and is running smoothly, doughnuts will be available for pre-order through the website as well as catering and wholesale.

“It will be a gentle rollout for friends and family and then a soft opening because we have all new equipment and new staff,” said Schultz. Based on the popularity of these unique tiered fried yeast cakes, the new shop will need to produce 600 to 1,000 a day to keep up with demand.

“We’re definitely not going to be able to do that right away,” Schultz said.

In addition to getting production up, Schultz would like to have his big, old-fashioned 1950s neon box sign up on the front of the shop. However, getting the sign in a timely manner has proved challenging. He chose a bold sign to add a bit of pizzazz to the clean, modern space with a bar and bar stools and two or three tables.

He anticipates that most customers will pick up a box of doughnuts to bring to work or home to their families, but there will be some space to sit and eat in the shop.

After running an online warehouse business for a decade, Schultz is looking forward to having a community-focused business in downtown Camas.

“It’s easy to get to know people here. There’s a real community,” he said, “I could sell more doughnuts in a parking lot next to a warehouse store, but I like the community feel of downtown Camas.”

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