<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=192888919167017&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
Saturday,  July 13 , 2024

Linkedin Pinterest
News / Churches & Religion

Black Protestant church still vital

Services offer hope, community despite an attendance drop

By Associated Press
Published: May 6, 2023, 6:04am
2 Photos
Calvernetta Williams, a long-time congregant of Zion Baptist Church, attends a virtual Sunday school class from her home in Columbia, S.C., on Sunday, April 16, 2023. Williams uses a hybrid model of attending church, Sunday school online, worship service in person, so that she can care for her husband who has Parkinson's.
Calvernetta Williams, a long-time congregant of Zion Baptist Church, attends a virtual Sunday school class from her home in Columbia, S.C., on Sunday, April 16, 2023. Williams uses a hybrid model of attending church, Sunday school online, worship service in person, so that she can care for her husband who has Parkinson's. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski) (Jessie Wardarski/Associated Press) Photo Gallery

COLUMBIA, S.C. — The wide empty spaces in pews between parishioners at a Sunday service at Zion Baptist Church in South Carolina’s capital highlight a post-pandemic reality common among many Black Protestant churches nationwide.

At its heyday in the 1960s, more than 1,500 parishioners filled every seat at Zion. But membership at the historic church — a crucial meeting point for many during the Civil Rights Movement — dwindled over recent decades.

The trend has been accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic, which infected and killed Black Americans at a disproportionate rate. Zion’s attendance dropped from 300 parishioners before the outbreak to 125.

Founded in 1865, Zion still has a choir capable of beautiful singing, but it also shrunk by more than half. The stomping of feet and the call-and-response of the leader and congregation have dimmed from what they were before the pandemic.

“It saddens my heart,” said Calvernetta Williams, who has worshipped at Zion for 40 years. “The pastor has a lot of outreach to do, and so do we … because it’ll never be the same.”

Zion’s shrinking attendance is in line with a recent Pew Research Center survey; it found significant attendance drop among Black Protestants that is unmatched by any other major religious group. The number of Black Protestants who say they attend services monthly has fallen from 61 percent in 2019 to 46 percent now, said Pew, and they are the only group in which more than half (54 percent) attend services virtually.

Zion broadcasts services online, produces digital content and is active on social media. But the Rev. M. Andrew Davis said his church’s virtual experience can’t match in-person interactions, including the smiles of children, and how sometimes older congregants share testimonials about how God healed them.

Davis’ sermon on a recent Sunday was titled: “Trust during times of trouble.” He recalled the pandemic as one the most challenging times in his church’s history — and offered words of hope. “We may not ever go back to the way it was, but we can do better,” Davis told parishioners.

Stay informed on what is happening in Clark County, WA and beyond for only
$9.99/mo

Black Americans — two-thirds of whom are Protestant — attend church more regularly than Americans overall, and pray more often, surveys show. But patterns of worship are shifting across generations: younger Black adults attend church less often than their elders, and those who attend are less likely to do so in a predominantly Black congregation.

“It’s imperative that we get our young people back,” said Donnie Mack, a deacon at Zion. “As we say in old churches — if you don’t see any young people, if you don’t hear any babies crying, then, you’re at a dying church.”

Several Black church leaders said it’s proved difficult to convince members to return for in-person worship. They note that many congregants are older, have inadequate access to health care, and hesitate to return to church for fear of catching a contagious illness.

Black adults also suffer from higher rates of obesity, diabetes and asthma, making them more susceptible. They are also more likely to be uninsured.

Additionally, many Black working people had jobs deemed essential and were less able to work from home during the pandemic, raising concerns about exposing others in their often crowded households to the virus.

“The pandemic exasperated that,” said the Rev. Quardricos Driskell, pastor at Beulah Baptist Church in Alexandria, Va.

Attendance at his 160-year-old church dropped from a peak of more than 200 people who met in two Sunday services in the early 2000s, to less than half that at a single service. “We’re lucky if we have 100 on any given Sunday,” Driskell said.

Despite the attendance drop, academics, pastors and parishioners agree that churches remain fundamental to Black communities, providing refuge and hope.

“No pillar of the African American community has been more central to its history, identity, and social justice vision than the ‘Black Church,’” Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. wrote in “The Black Church,” his companion volume to the PBS series.

“For a people systematically brutalized and debased by the inhumane system of slavery, followed by a century of Jim Crow racism, the church provided a refuge: a place of racial and individual self-affirmation, of teaching and learning, of psychological and spiritual sustenance, of prophetic faith.”

Loading...