Monday, March 1, 2021
March 1, 2021

Linkedin Pinterest

Business

Business BriefsClark County BusinessColumnistsTransactionsClark County At Work
FILE - In this May 4, 2020 file photo, a container ship passes the Ford car plant in Cologne, Germany, as the US car maker restarts the production after the coronavirus lockdown. Ford says it will spend $1 billion to modernize its Cologne, Germany, manufacturing center, converting it into a European electric vehicle factory.

Ford to go all electric in Europe by 2030

FILE - In this May 4, 2020 file photo, a container ship passes the Ford car plant in Cologne, Germany, as the US car maker restarts the production after the coronavirus lockdown. Ford says it will spend $1 billion to modernize its Cologne, Germany, manufacturing center, converting it into a European electric vehicle factory.

February 17, 2021, 8:33am Business

FRANKFURT, Germany — Ford is vowing to convert its entire passenger vehicle lineup in Europe to electric power by 2030 in just the latest sign of the seismic technological changes sweeping the auto industry. Read story

Reebok struggling to remain relevant as Adidas gives up on brand

February 17, 2021, 8:32am Business

Oh how things change in the sneaker business. Reebok, for a brief moment the kingpin of the athletic footwear industry, is now being cast off by a rival that couldn’t turn the brand around. Read story

FILE - In this March 30, 2020 file photo, workers at Amazon's fulfillment center in Staten Island, N.Y., gather outside to protest work conditions in the company's warehouse in New York.  Amazon is facing a lawsuit from the New York Attorney General's office that claims the online shopping powerhouse didn't provide adequate health and safety measures for workers at its New York facilities during the coronavirus pandemic and took retaliatory action against multiple employees.

New York sues Amazon over worker safety during pandemic

FILE - In this March 30, 2020 file photo, workers at Amazon's fulfillment center in Staten Island, N.Y., gather outside to protest work conditions in the company's warehouse in New York.  Amazon is facing a lawsuit from the New York Attorney General's office that claims the online shopping powerhouse didn't provide adequate health and safety measures for workers at its New York facilities during the coronavirus pandemic and took retaliatory action against multiple employees.

February 17, 2021, 8:30am Business

New York is suing Amazon, claiming the company failed to provide workers with a safe environment at two warehouses in the state as COVID-19 infections surged nationwide. Read story

FILE - In this May 13, 2020, file photo, Ford Motor Co., line workers put together ventilators that the automaker is assembling at the Ford Rawsonville plant in Ypsilanti Township, Mich. U.S. industrial production increased 0.4% in November with manufacturing receiving a boost from a rebound in output at auto plants after three months of declines. The Federal Reserve reported Tuesday, Dec. 15 that the November gain in industrial output followed an even stronger 0.9% increase in October.

U.S. industrial production climbs 0.9% in January

FILE - In this May 13, 2020, file photo, Ford Motor Co., line workers put together ventilators that the automaker is assembling at the Ford Rawsonville plant in Ypsilanti Township, Mich. U.S. industrial production increased 0.4% in November with manufacturing receiving a boost from a rebound in output at auto plants after three months of declines. The Federal Reserve reported Tuesday, Dec. 15 that the November gain in industrial output followed an even stronger 0.9% increase in October.

February 17, 2021, 8:29am Business

WASHINGTON — American industry expanded for the fourth consecutive month in January but has yet to recover fully to the level of activity that preceded the pandemic. Read story

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon stands on his kitchen counter to warm his feet over his gas stove Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021, in Austin, Texas. Power was out for thousands of central Texas residents after temperatures dropped into the single digits when a snow storm hit the area on Sunday night.

‘A complete bungle’: Texas’ energy pride goes out with cold

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon stands on his kitchen counter to warm his feet over his gas stove Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021, in Austin, Texas. Power was out for thousands of central Texas residents after temperatures dropped into the single digits when a snow storm hit the area on Sunday night.

February 17, 2021, 8:29am Business

AUSTIN, Texas — Anger over Texas’ power grid failing in the face of a record winter freeze continued to mount Wednesday as millions of residents in the energy capital of the U.S. remained shivering with no assurances that their electricity and heat — out since Monday in many homes —… Read story

Intel discriminated against eight older workers in 2015 layoffs, EEOC finds

February 17, 2021, 8:23am Business

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has concluded that Intel discriminated against eight older workers during mass layoffs in 2015, according to an agency document obtained by The Oregonian/OregonLive. Read story

FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2019, file photo workers process chickens at the Lincoln Premium Poultry plant, Costco Wholesale's dedicated poultry supplier, in Fremont, Neb. U.S. wholesale prices rose 0.3% in August 2020, just half the July gain, as food and energy prices decline. The Labor Department said Thursday, Sept. 10 that the August advance in the producer price index -- which measures inflation before it reaches consumers -- followed a 0.6% surge in June which was the biggest monthly gain since October 2018.

Wholesale prices surge 1.3%, led by health care and energy

FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2019, file photo workers process chickens at the Lincoln Premium Poultry plant, Costco Wholesale's dedicated poultry supplier, in Fremont, Neb. U.S. wholesale prices rose 0.3% in August 2020, just half the July gain, as food and energy prices decline. The Labor Department said Thursday, Sept. 10 that the August advance in the producer price index -- which measures inflation before it reaches consumers -- followed a 0.6% surge in June which was the biggest monthly gain since October 2018.

February 17, 2021, 8:00am Business

WASHINGTON — U.S. wholesale prices surged by a record 1.3% in January, led by big gains in health care and energy prices. Read story

Alicia Rose, left, personal trainer and group fitness instructor at Northwest Personal Training, works with Cliff Miller of Vancouver in downtown Vancouver. Gyms are now open for 25 percent capacity for in-person training.

Clark County gyms pumped to reopen

Alicia Rose, left, personal trainer and group fitness instructor at Northwest Personal Training, works with Cliff Miller of Vancouver in downtown Vancouver. Gyms are now open for 25 percent capacity for in-person training.

February 17, 2021, 6:03am Business

Clark County gyms are welcoming relaxed Phase 2 restrictions that went into place this week, but they’re eager for more. Read story

In this photo provided by the New York Stock Exchange, trader Fred DeMarco, left, works on the trading floor, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021. Stocks were modestly higher in morning trading Tuesday, pushed by energy companies who have seen record electricity prices due to the frigid cold impacting much of the country.

Stocks slightly higher, natural gas prices climb sharply

In this photo provided by the New York Stock Exchange, trader Fred DeMarco, left, works on the trading floor, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021. Stocks were modestly higher in morning trading Tuesday, pushed by energy companies who have seen record electricity prices due to the frigid cold impacting much of the country.

February 16, 2021, 1:15pm Business

U.S. stock indexes closed mostly lower Tuesday as losses in health care and technology companies kept gains in energy and other sectors of the market in check. Read story

The Bitcoin logo appears on the display screen of a crypto currency ATM at the Smoker's Choice store, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021, in Salem, N.H.  After a wild week in which Bitcoin soared to new heights, Bitcoin is crossing the $50,000 mark. Bitcoin rallied last week as more companies signaled the volatile digital currency could eventually gain widespread acceptance as a means of payment for goods and services.

Cost of a single Bitcoin exceeds $50,000 for first time

The Bitcoin logo appears on the display screen of a crypto currency ATM at the Smoker's Choice store, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021, in Salem, N.H.  After a wild week in which Bitcoin soared to new heights, Bitcoin is crossing the $50,000 mark. Bitcoin rallied last week as more companies signaled the volatile digital currency could eventually gain widespread acceptance as a means of payment for goods and services.

February 16, 2021, 7:54am Business

SILVER SPRING, Md. — The seemingly unstoppable rise of Bitcoin continued Tuesday with the cost of a single unit of the digital currency rising above $50,000 for the first time. Read story