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Monday,  June 24 , 2024

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Stories by Martin Middlewood

Columbian freelance contributor

From foot soldier to aviator and balloonist, Carlton Foster Bond (1893-1980) was commander of Pearson Field, and briefly of the 321st Observation Squadron made up of Air Corps reserves. He was known as an excellent administrator and commander. When he retired, he returned to Vancouver to live until 1980.

Clark County History: Carlton Foster Bond

From foot soldier to aviator and balloonist, Carlton Foster Bond (1893-1980) was commander of Pearson Field, and briefly of the 321st Observation Squadron made up of Air Corps reserves. He was known as an excellent administrator and commander. When he retired, he returned to Vancouver to live until 1980.

November 18, 2023, 6:03am Clark County Life

Visitors to Pearson Air Museum often mistake the bronze statue there as a tribute to Alexander Pearson, the park’s namesake. However, inspecting the plaque, they discover it represents Carlton Foster Bond. Unlike Pearson, Bond was closely connected to the airfield, serving as its commander twice, first as a lieutenant (1929… Read story

Descending from a well-connected family set George Gibbs (1816-1873) on a scholarly path that included helping on surveys for the northern transcontinental railroad route, the border between the Washington Territory and Canada and ethnography of the Indigenous peoples of the territory. His namesake father was a noted Yale geologist, and his grandfather, Oliver Wolcott Jr., was the second U.S.

Clark County History: George Gibbs

Descending from a well-connected family set George Gibbs (1816-1873) on a scholarly path that included helping on surveys for the northern transcontinental railroad route, the border between the Washington Territory and Canada and ethnography of the Indigenous peoples of the territory. His namesake father was a noted Yale geologist, and his grandfather, Oliver Wolcott Jr., was the second U.S.

November 11, 2023, 6:04am Clark County Life

Mostly unknown today, George Gibbs went hands-on with several crucial aspects involving Washington Territory, including documenting Indigenous tribes and languages and participating in surveys for the transcontinental railroad’s northern route and the territorial-Canadian boundary. Later, he worked on resolving Hudson’s Bay Company’s claims against the United States. Read story

The only known photograph of Marguerite McLoughlin (circa 1775-1860) is this daguerreotype taken later in her life. She was known as a kind and loving person whose calmness balanced the quick temper of her husband, John McLoughlin. Earlier in life, she was also regarded for her beauty and strength of character. A skillful seamstress, she enjoyed teaching other women needlework and beadwork.

Clark County History: Marguerite McLoughlin, the first lady of Fort Vancouver

The only known photograph of Marguerite McLoughlin (circa 1775-1860) is this daguerreotype taken later in her life. She was known as a kind and loving person whose calmness balanced the quick temper of her husband, John McLoughlin. Earlier in life, she was also regarded for her beauty and strength of character. A skillful seamstress, she enjoyed teaching other women needlework and beadwork.

November 4, 2023, 6:11am Clark County Life

Before Marguerite McLoughlin (circa 1775-1860) became first lady of Fort Vancouver, she was married to Alexander McKay (MacKay), a clerk at the North West Company’s Fort William in present day Canada. He later took their son, Thomas, to help John Jacob Astor found Fort George at the mouth of the… Read story

Aviator Charles A. Lindbergh stands in front of his plane "The Spirit of St. Louis" in May 1927 in New York before his historic solo flight to Paris. While flying his plane around the United States promoting aviation, he bypassed Pearson Field, only dropping a message. Visiting his brother-in-law in 1948, he and Anne parked their trailer near the Lewis River.

Images From the Attic: Lindbergh in Clark County

Aviator Charles A. Lindbergh stands in front of his plane "The Spirit of St. Louis" in May 1927 in New York before his historic solo flight to Paris. While flying his plane around the United States promoting aviation, he bypassed Pearson Field, only dropping a message. Visiting his brother-in-law in 1948, he and Anne parked their trailer near the Lewis River.

October 28, 2023, 5:59am Clark County Life

Vancouverites felt slighted in September 1927 when Charles Lindbergh landed across the Columbia River in Portland and not at Pearson Field, the site of many early aviation firsts. Still, three stories connect Southwest Washington to the famous pilot. One about a fly-under, one about a flyover and one about camping. Read story

In 1941, Evelyn Burleson Waldren flew a goodwill tour from Vancouver, B.C., to Tijuana, Mexico (almost), in a 700-pound airplane, Lady Liberty. After trying for months to get permits from Canada and Mexico, she finally secured them. Taking off Oct. 1, 1941, she flew for 16 1/2  hours before landing in the U.S. just across the border from Tijuana, Mexico, a record for a lightweight plane.

Clark County History: Evelyn Waldren

In 1941, Evelyn Burleson Waldren flew a goodwill tour from Vancouver, B.C., to Tijuana, Mexico (almost), in a 700-pound airplane, Lady Liberty. After trying for months to get permits from Canada and Mexico, she finally secured them. Taking off Oct. 1, 1941, she flew for 16 1/2  hours before landing in the U.S. just across the border from Tijuana, Mexico, a record for a lightweight plane.

October 21, 2023, 6:05am Clark County Life

Evelyn Waldren always seemed on the move, mostly in lightweight airplanes. She began her aviation career as the first woman to fly in Nebraska and ended it as a grandmotherly flight instructor at Vancouver’s Evergreen Airport in the mid-1980s. In her 58 years in the air, she logged 23,700 flight… Read story

Cpl. Tubby and his Marine handler, Guy Wachtsletter, conduct a combat training exercise during World War II. He was one of thousands of dogs enlisted into service through the Dogs for Defense program that began in 1942. Tubby was one of many canine casualties in the Pacific Theater. He died in action during the battle for Guam in 1944, and is listed on the Ridgefield Veterans Memorial. (U.S.

Clark County History: Dogs of war

Cpl. Tubby and his Marine handler, Guy Wachtsletter, conduct a combat training exercise during World War II. He was one of thousands of dogs enlisted into service through the Dogs for Defense program that began in 1942. Tubby was one of many canine casualties in the Pacific Theater. He died in action during the battle for Guam in 1944, and is listed on the Ridgefield Veterans Memorial. (U.S.

October 14, 2023, 6:15am Clark County Life

Cpl. Tubby, a dog from Ridgefield, died protecting his handler in the Pacific Theater during World War II. Susan Orlean mentioned him in her book “Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend,” which tells the story of the many dogs with that name, starting with the Rin Tin Tin… Read story

Law officers captured this illegal still in 1925. Rarely were such large stills placed inside buildings. Distilling alcohol poses the hazards of fire and explosion because the process releases flammable compounds. Outlaw distillers in Clark County, like Jesse Cousins, often hid stills on their rural farms.

Clark County History: Moonshiner

Law officers captured this illegal still in 1925. Rarely were such large stills placed inside buildings. Distilling alcohol poses the hazards of fire and explosion because the process releases flammable compounds. Outlaw distillers in Clark County, like Jesse Cousins, often hid stills on their rural farms.

October 7, 2023, 6:03am Clark County Life

In Washington, urban and rural voters split in 1914 over alcohol. By an 18,632 margin, voters that year approved an initiative prohibiting liquor production, distribution and sale — but not consumption. The vote split between “wet” big cities and “dry” rural towns. Yet moonshiners in rural Clark County would illegally… Read story

This portrait of George Simpson (circa 1787-1860) shows him as he was best known: as an imperious administrator who focused on efficiency and cost reduction, foreshadowing the modern corporation. He wasn't a man who trapped or hunted, but he successfully integrated the British North West Company with the Hudson Bay Company in 1821.

Clark County History: George Simpson

This portrait of George Simpson (circa 1787-1860) shows him as he was best known: as an imperious administrator who focused on efficiency and cost reduction, foreshadowing the modern corporation. He wasn't a man who trapped or hunted, but he successfully integrated the British North West Company with the Hudson Bay Company in 1821.

September 30, 2023, 6:02am Clark County Life

Near where the Washington School for the Deaf stands today, George Simpson, governor of the Hudson’s Bay Company, and John McLoughlin, chief factor of the company’s Columbia District, picked the original site for Fort Vancouver in 1824. Simpson’s territory covered all lands west of the Rockies to Hawaii, north to… Read story

Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan used this portrait in his presidential bid against President Abraham Lincoln in 1864. Like several other Civil War generals, McClellan served at the Vancouver Barracks before the war. While there, he was a captain under Col. B.L.E. Bonneville, the post commander. Because he was in the engineering corps, he did a survey attempting to find the best routes for roads and railroads for Isaac Stevens, Washington Territory governor.

Clark County History: Capt. George B. McClellan

Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan used this portrait in his presidential bid against President Abraham Lincoln in 1864. Like several other Civil War generals, McClellan served at the Vancouver Barracks before the war. While there, he was a captain under Col. B.L.E. Bonneville, the post commander. Because he was in the engineering corps, he did a survey attempting to find the best routes for roads and railroads for Isaac Stevens, Washington Territory governor.

September 23, 2023, 6:02am Clark County Life

The 1846 West Point graduate Capt. George B. McClellan came to the Vancouver Barracks in 1853 after serving in the War with Mexico. An engineering officer since his graduation, the Army assigned McClellan to Isaac Stevens, Washington Territory governor. Stevens wanted the captain to survey the Cascade Mountains, probing probable… Read story

The first humorous aviation publication, Tale Spins, spun out of the creative minds of two pilots, Walt and Ann Bohrer. This envelope suggests what the content might appear like inside Tale Spins, the first inflight airline magazine. Airplane enthusiasts enjoyed the humorous and gossipy publication.

Clark County History: First in-flight magazine

The first humorous aviation publication, Tale Spins, spun out of the creative minds of two pilots, Walt and Ann Bohrer. This envelope suggests what the content might appear like inside Tale Spins, the first inflight airline magazine. Airplane enthusiasts enjoyed the humorous and gossipy publication.

September 16, 2023, 6:02am Clark County Life

United Airlines and Continental Airlines, although one company today, sprouted roots at Pearson Field in Vancouver. Likewise, so did the first airline magazine, Tails Spins. The magazine was written and illustrated by hand, reproduced using a mimeograph, put in an envelope and mailed. Today, we might call it a comic… Read story