Friday, October 23, 2020
Oct. 23, 2020

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Washington submits virus vaccine distribution plan to CDC

October 21, 2020, 12:38pm Health

SEATTLE  -- Health officials in Washington state have announced how they plan to distribute the coronavirus vaccine when it becomes available. Read story

Virus spikes have officials looking to shore up hospitals

October 21, 2020, 12:38pm Health

Hospitals across the United States are starting to buckle from a resurgence of COVID-19 cases, with several states setting records for the number of people hospitalized and leaders scrambling to… Read story

Washington surpasses 100,000 confirmed virus cases

October 22, 2020, 8:17pm Health

SEATTLE — State data shows the number of people with confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Washington has surpassed 100,000. Read story

Washington residents warned of drug surge, dangers of fentanyl

October 22, 2020, 8:16pm Health

SPOKANE — Federal and state officials have warned residents in Eastern Washington about the dangers of illicit synthetic opioids after multiple teenagers died in recent weeks. Read story

Idaho may send new virus cases to Seattle, Portland

October 22, 2020, 6:44pm Health

COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho — People with COVID-19 in Northern Idaho soon may have to be sent to Seattle or Portland, Oregon, because the region’s hospitals are nearing capacity. Read story

FILE - In this Aug. 30, 2020 file photo, Sal Lando, left, of Sterling, holds up signs during a protest against mandatory flu vaccinations, outside the Massachusetts State House, in Boston. Years before this year's anti-mask and reopening demonstrations, vaccine opponents were working on reinventing their image around a rallying cry of civil liberties and medical freedom. Now, boosted by the pandemic and the political climate, their rebranding is appealing to a different subset of society invested in civil liberties -- and, some health officials say, undercutting public health efforts during a critical moment for vaccines.

Stressing freedom, vaccine opponents rebranding in virus era

FILE - In this Aug. 30, 2020 file photo, Sal Lando, left, of Sterling, holds up signs during a protest against mandatory flu vaccinations, outside the Massachusetts State House, in Boston. Years before this year's anti-mask and reopening demonstrations, vaccine opponents were working on reinventing their image around a rallying cry of civil liberties and medical freedom. Now, boosted by the pandemic and the political climate, their rebranding is appealing to a different subset of society invested in civil liberties -- and, some health officials say, undercutting public health efforts during a critical moment for vaccines.

October 22, 2020, 12:45pm Health

Years before this year’s anti-mask and reopening demonstrations, vaccine opponents were working on reinventing their image around a rallying cry of civil liberties and medical freedom. Read story

Confronting Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer Awareness

Each year, more than 200,000 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer, including thousands of women in Washington. In honor of their fight — and as part of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month — The Columbian published this collection of stories about the women who have received breast cancer diagnoses, the science and technological advances for treating them and the community that supports them.

Abs 2019-nCoV RNA virus - 3d rendered image on black background.

Clark County reports 47 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths on Thursday

Abs 2019-nCoV RNA virus - 3d rendered image on black background.

October 22, 2020, 12:07pm Clark County Health

Clark County recorded 47 new COVID-19 cases and no new deaths on Thursday, according to the latest data from Clark County Public Health. Read story

FILE - In this July 27, 2020, file photo, Nurse Kathe Olmstead prepares a shot that is part of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., in Binghamton, N.Y.  The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will hold a meeting to discuss the process of approving COVID-19 vaccines.

U.S. regulators, experts take up thorny vaccine study issues

FILE - In this July 27, 2020, file photo, Nurse Kathe Olmstead prepares a shot that is part of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., in Binghamton, N.Y.  The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will hold a meeting to discuss the process of approving COVID-19 vaccines.

October 22, 2020, 9:04am Health

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. regulators who will decide the fate of COVID-19 vaccines took an unusual step Thursday: Asking outside scientists if their standards are high enough. Read story

The homepage for Washington Listens at walistens.org.

Washington Listens call line provides support for ongoing COVID stress

The homepage for Washington Listens at walistens.org.

October 22, 2020, 8:51am Health

LONGVIEW — For Washingtonians feeling stressed, anxious or depressed because of the COVID-19 pandemic, a state call line offers a listening ear or connections to help. Read story

This undated photo provided by Diane Urban, shows her and her son Jordan Garmatter. After watching President Donald Trump target the son of former Vice President Joe Biden for his history of substance abuse, Urban, a Republican from Delphos, Ohio, was reminded again of the shame her son lived with during his own battle with addiction. As Trump nears the end of his first term, some supporters, including Urban, feel left behind by his administration's drug policies.

Worsening opioid crisis overshadowed in presidential race

This undated photo provided by Diane Urban, shows her and her son Jordan Garmatter. After watching President Donald Trump target the son of former Vice President Joe Biden for his history of substance abuse, Urban, a Republican from Delphos, Ohio, was reminded again of the shame her son lived with during his own battle with addiction. As Trump nears the end of his first term, some supporters, including Urban, feel left behind by his administration's drug policies.

October 21, 2020, 12:44pm Health

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Like millions of Americans, Diane Urban watched the first presidential debate last month at home with her family. When it was over, she turned off the television and climbed into the bed her 25-year-old son Jordan used to sleep in. Read story