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June 18, 2021

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More evidence suggests COVID-19 was in U.S. by Christmas 2019

June 15, 2021, 9:05am Health

NEW YORK — A new analysis of blood samples from 24,000 Americans taken early last year is the latest and largest study to suggest that the new coronavirus popped up in the U.S. in December 2019 — weeks before cases were first recognized by health officials. Read story

You don't need to sit cross-legged to meditate. Just find a comfortable position where you can be relaxed yet alert.

Meditation: Doing little, achieving a lot

You don't need to sit cross-legged to meditate. Just find a comfortable position where you can be relaxed yet alert.

June 15, 2021, 6:04am Clark County Health

For so many of us, the hardest thing to do is nothing. Read story

FILE - In this Oct. 7, 1954, file photo, Dr. Jonas Salk, developer of the polio vaccine, holds a rack of test tubes in his lab in Pittsburgh. Tens of millions of today's older Americans lived through the polio epidemic, their childhood summers dominated by concern about the virus. Some parents banned their kids from public swimming pools and neighborhood playgrounds and avoided large gatherings. Some of those from the polio era are sharing their memories with today's youngsters as a lesson of hope for the battle against COVID-19. Soon after polio vaccines became widely available, U.S. cases and death tolls plummeted to hundreds a year, then dozens in the 1960s, and to U.S. eradication in 1979. A handful of cases since then have arrived in visitors from overseas.

Those who recall early days of polio vaccine weigh in on COVID-19

FILE - In this Oct. 7, 1954, file photo, Dr. Jonas Salk, developer of the polio vaccine, holds a rack of test tubes in his lab in Pittsburgh. Tens of millions of today's older Americans lived through the polio epidemic, their childhood summers dominated by concern about the virus. Some parents banned their kids from public swimming pools and neighborhood playgrounds and avoided large gatherings. Some of those from the polio era are sharing their memories with today's youngsters as a lesson of hope for the battle against COVID-19. Soon after polio vaccines became widely available, U.S. cases and death tolls plummeted to hundreds a year, then dozens in the 1960s, and to U.S. eradication in 1979. A handful of cases since then have arrived in visitors from overseas.

June 15, 2021, 6:04am Health

CINCINNATI — The COVID-19 pandemic and the distribution of the vaccines that will prevent it have surfaced haunting memories for Americans who lived through an earlier time when the country was swept by a virus that, for so long, appeared to have no cure or way to prevent it. Read story

Cluster headaches can strike quickly

June 15, 2021, 6:03am Health

June is Migraine and Headache Awareness Month, which makes this a good time to learn more about one of the most painful types of headache: the cluster headache. Read story

Task force: Begin colorectal cancer screening at age 45

June 15, 2021, 6:02am Health

Screening for colorectal cancer is now recommended for all people, beginning at age 45 rather than 50. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently updated its guidelines to begin screening five years earlier because of the increase in younger people developing colorectal cancer. Read story

Wuhan, China - East Asia, Corona virus, Pneumonia

Clark County reports 116 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths as disease activity falls

Wuhan, China - East Asia, Corona virus, Pneumonia

June 14, 2021, 12:00pm Clark County Health

Clark County reported 116 new COVID-19 cases and no new deaths since Friday as daily case counts fall and the percent of fully vaccinated residents passes the 50 percent mark. The new cases include 97 that were confirmed by molecular (PCR) testing, for a total of 24,098 to date, and… Read story

As US COVID-19 death toll nears 600,000, racial gaps persist

June 14, 2021, 11:53am Health

Jerry Ramos spent his final days in a California hospital, hooked to an oxygen machine with blood clots in his lungs from COVID-19, his 3-year-old daughter in his thoughts. Read story

FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, file photo, a vial of the Phase 3 Novavax coronavirus vaccine is seen ready for use in the trial at St. George's University hospital in London. Novavax says its vaccine appears effective against COVID-19 in a large study, including against variants. Results from the study in the U.S. and Mexico were released on Monday, June 14, 2021.

Novavax: Large study finds COVID-19 shot about 90% effective

FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, file photo, a vial of the Phase 3 Novavax coronavirus vaccine is seen ready for use in the trial at St. George's University hospital in London. Novavax says its vaccine appears effective against COVID-19 in a large study, including against variants. Results from the study in the U.S. and Mexico were released on Monday, June 14, 2021.

June 14, 2021, 7:30am Business

Vaccine maker Novavax said Monday its COVID-19 shot was highly effective against the disease and also protected against variants in a large study in the U.S. and Mexico, potentially offering the world yet another weapon against the virus at a time when developing countries are desperate for doses. Read story

In June 2012, medical personnel at Forward Operating Base Edinburgh, in Helmand Province, discuss a patient???s case. (Nelvin C.

The ‘Golden Hour’: How the Afghan war brought advances in battlefield medicine

In June 2012, medical personnel at Forward Operating Base Edinburgh, in Helmand Province, discuss a patient???s case. (Nelvin C.

June 13, 2021, 6:00am Health

SAN DIEGO — When the last U.S. service member leaves Afghanistan, perhaps by early next month, America’s longest war on foreign soil will end — and so too a mission initially dubbed Operation Enduring Freedom. Read story

Dr. Kristin Lottig, 50, a pediatrician at Kaiser Permanente's Salmon Creek Clinic, emphasizes that vaccines are safe and effective, including for children. "While most kids do fine and get through the flu or maybe they'll have a mild complication, there are some kids who do get really sick and die every year.

Working in Clark County: Dr. Kristin Lottig, pediatrician at Kaiser

Dr. Kristin Lottig, 50, a pediatrician at Kaiser Permanente's Salmon Creek Clinic, emphasizes that vaccines are safe and effective, including for children. "While most kids do fine and get through the flu or maybe they'll have a mild complication, there are some kids who do get really sick and die every year.

June 12, 2021, 6:03am Business

Pediatrician Dr. Kristin Lottig has been busy over the last year assuaging concerns from parents during the COVID-19 pandemic. Read story