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FILE - In this April 26, 2021 file photo, a nursing student administers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination center at UNLV, in Las Vegas. Families and patients have a new online tool to compare COVID-19 vaccination rates among nursing homes, Medicare announced Tuesday, Sept. 21, addressing complaints from consumer groups and lawmakers that the critical data had been too difficult to find.

Consumers get online tool to check nursing home vaccine data

FILE - In this April 26, 2021 file photo, a nursing student administers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination center at UNLV, in Las Vegas. Families and patients have a new online tool to compare COVID-19 vaccination rates among nursing homes, Medicare announced Tuesday, Sept. 21, addressing complaints from consumer groups and lawmakers that the critical data had been too difficult to find.

September 21, 2021, 1:10pm Health

WASHINGTON — Families and patients have a new online tool to compare COVID-19 vaccination rates among nursing homes, Medicare announced Tuesday, addressing complaints from consumer groups and lawmakers that the critical data had been too difficult to find. Read story

This image provided by Abbot in September 2021 shows packaging for their BinaxNOW self test for COVID-19. President Joe Biden is betting on millions more rapid, at-home tests to help curb the latest deadly wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, which is overloading hospitals and threatening to shutter classrooms around the country. But the tests have already disappeared from pharmacy shelves in many parts of the U.S., and manufacturers warn it will take them weeks to ramp up production, which was slashed after demand for the tests plummeted over the summer of 2021.

Biden bets on rapid COVID tests but they can be hard to find

This image provided by Abbot in September 2021 shows packaging for their BinaxNOW self test for COVID-19. President Joe Biden is betting on millions more rapid, at-home tests to help curb the latest deadly wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, which is overloading hospitals and threatening to shutter classrooms around the country. But the tests have already disappeared from pharmacy shelves in many parts of the U.S., and manufacturers warn it will take them weeks to ramp up production, which was slashed after demand for the tests plummeted over the summer of 2021.

September 21, 2021, 10:50am Health

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden is betting on millions more rapid, at-home tests to help curb the latest deadly wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, which is overloading hospitals and threatening to shutter classrooms around the country. Read story

FILE - In this March 26, 2021, file photo a member of the Philadelphia Fire Department prepares a dose of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination site setup in Philadelphia. Religious objections, once used only sparingly around the country to get exempted from various required vaccines, are becoming a much more widely used loophole against the COVID-19 shot.

J&J: Booster dose of its COVID shot prompts strong response

FILE - In this March 26, 2021, file photo a member of the Philadelphia Fire Department prepares a dose of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination site setup in Philadelphia. Religious objections, once used only sparingly around the country to get exempted from various required vaccines, are becoming a much more widely used loophole against the COVID-19 shot.

September 21, 2021, 10:11am Health

LONDON — Johnson & Johnson said Tuesday that a booster of its one-shot coronavirus vaccine provides a stronger immune response months after people receive a first dose. Read story

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PeaceHealth now offering monoclonal antibody therapy for COVID-19

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September 20, 2021, 11:45am Clark County Health

PeaceHealth announced Monday that it has begun offering monoclonal antibody therapy to patients considered at risk for severe complications from COVID-19. Read story

A girl leads her mother and brothers as they arrive at Brooklyn's PS 245, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021, in New York. Classroom doors are swinging open for about a million New York City public school students in the nation's largest experiment of in-person learning during the coronavirus pandemic.

New York City to conduct weekly COVID-19 tests in schools

A girl leads her mother and brothers as they arrive at Brooklyn's PS 245, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021, in New York. Classroom doors are swinging open for about a million New York City public school students in the nation's largest experiment of in-person learning during the coronavirus pandemic.

September 20, 2021, 10:40am Health

NEW YORK — New York City will begin conducting weekly, random COVID-19 tests of unvaccinated students in the nation’s largest school district in an attempt to more quickly spot outbreaks in classrooms. Read story

COVID has killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 flu

September 20, 2021, 10:26am Health

COVID-19 has now killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 Spanish flu pandemic did — approximately 675,000. And like the worldwide scourge of a century ago, the coronavirus may never entirely disappear from our midst. Read story

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2020, file photo, a droplet falls from a syringe after a person was injected with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a hospital in Providence, R.I.

Pfizer says COVID-19 vaccine works in kids ages 5 to 11

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2020, file photo, a droplet falls from a syringe after a person was injected with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a hospital in Providence, R.I.

September 20, 2021, 10:08am Health

Pfizer said Monday its COVID-19 vaccine works for children ages 5 to 11 and that it will seek U.S. authorization for this age group soon — a key step toward beginning vaccinations for youngsters. Read story

FILE - In this Sept. 4, 2021, file photo, a man receives the Johnson & Johnson vaccine in a bus that serves as a mobile COVID-19 vaccination unit in Bucharest, Romania. In both the U.S. and the EU, officials are struggling with the same question: how to boost vaccination rates to the max and end a pandemic that has repeatedly thwarted efforts to control it. In the European Union, officials in many places are requiring people to show proof of vaccination, a negative test or recent recovery from COVID-19 to participate in everyday activities -- even sometimes to go to work.

Same goal, different paths: U.S., EU seek max vaccine rates

FILE - In this Sept. 4, 2021, file photo, a man receives the Johnson & Johnson vaccine in a bus that serves as a mobile COVID-19 vaccination unit in Bucharest, Romania. In both the U.S. and the EU, officials are struggling with the same question: how to boost vaccination rates to the max and end a pandemic that has repeatedly thwarted efforts to control it. In the European Union, officials in many places are requiring people to show proof of vaccination, a negative test or recent recovery from COVID-19 to participate in everyday activities -- even sometimes to go to work.

September 19, 2021, 1:16pm Health

BRUSSELS — The Belgian town of Aarschot has a vaccination rate of 94% of all adults, but Mayor Gwendolyn Rutten worries her town is too close for comfort to the capital of Brussels, where the rate stands at 63%. But there’s not much she can do about it. Read story

More than half of states have rolled back public health powers in pandemic

September 19, 2021, 6:53am Health

Republican legislators in more than half of U.S. states, spurred on by voters angry about lockdowns and mask mandates, are taking away the powers state and local officials use to protect the public against infectious diseases. Read story

Feds: Doctor in female genital mutilation case part of secret network who cut girls

September 19, 2021, 6:03am Health

DETROIT — Northville Dr. Jumana Nagarwala may be the only physician on trial on charges of performing female genital mutilation on minor girls in the U.S., but she wasn’t the only doctor who was cutting children, federal prosecutors disclosed Thursday. Read story