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FILE - In this Monday, March 9, 2020 file photo, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the World Health Organization speaks during a news conference on updates regarding COVID-19, at the WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. The head of the World Health Organization warned against the idea that herd immunity might be a realistic strategy to stop the pandemic, dismissing such proposals as "unethical." At a press briefing on Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said health officials typically aim to achieve herd immunity -- where the entire population is protected from a virus when the majority are immune -- by vaccination. Tedros noted that to obtain herd immunity from measles, for example, about 95% of the population must be vaccinated.

WHO chief: Idea of relying on herd immunity to stop pandemic ‘simply unethical’

FILE - In this Monday, March 9, 2020 file photo, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the World Health Organization speaks during a news conference on updates regarding COVID-19, at the WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. The head of the World Health Organization warned against the idea that herd immunity might be a realistic strategy to stop the pandemic, dismissing such proposals as "unethical." At a press briefing on Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said health officials typically aim to achieve herd immunity -- where the entire population is protected from a virus when the majority are immune -- by vaccination. Tedros noted that to obtain herd immunity from measles, for example, about 95% of the population must be vaccinated.

October 12, 2020, 3:20pm Health

LONDON (AP) — The head of the World Health Organization warned against the idea that herd immunity might be a realistic strategy to stop the pandemic, dismissing such proposals as “simply unethical.” Read story

This illustration shows the 2019 Novel Coronavirus.

Clark County sets record for new COVID-19 cases, adding 157 in three days

This illustration shows the 2019 Novel Coronavirus.

October 12, 2020, 11:29am Clark County Health

Clark County set a record for new COVID-19 cases this weekend, adding 157 new cases since Friday, according to Clark County Public Health. One person died from the disease. Read story

For 3rd day, Oregon reported more than 400 COVID-19 cases

October 12, 2020, 7:23am Health

Public health officials for the third day in a row reported more than 400 new known cases of COVID-19 in Oregon. Read story

Irm Diorio (left), director of Decatur Makers, William Strika (center), executive director of Roswell Firelabs and Skyler Holobach (right), co-founder of Atlanta Shield Makers, pose with face shields they created on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020 at Roswell Firelabs in Roswell, Georgia.

Months into pandemic, PPE shortage persists

Irm Diorio (left), director of Decatur Makers, William Strika (center), executive director of Roswell Firelabs and Skyler Holobach (right), co-founder of Atlanta Shield Makers, pose with face shields they created on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020 at Roswell Firelabs in Roswell, Georgia.

October 12, 2020, 6:00am Health

ATLANTA — Back in March as the pandemic took hold, Atlanta pediatrician Joy Maxey’s two-year supply of high-filtering N95s masks was gone in weeks. Other critically needed equipment was quickly depleted, too. She couldn’t just pick up the phone and order more; her regular vendors didn’t have it. She had to spend hours daily trying to find the precious gear. Read story

After losing her health insurance earlier this year, D.j. Mattern, who has Type 1 diabetes, turned to a growing underground network of people with diabetes who share extra insulin free of charge when they have it.

Not pandemic-proof: Insulin copay caps fall short, fueling underground exchanges

After losing her health insurance earlier this year, D.j. Mattern, who has Type 1 diabetes, turned to a growing underground network of people with diabetes who share extra insulin free of charge when they have it.

October 11, 2020, 12:30pm Health

DENVER — D.j. Mattern had her Type 1 diabetes under control until COVID-19’s economic upheaval cost her husband his hotel maintenance job and their health coverage. The 42-year-old Denver woman suddenly faced insulin’s exorbitant list price anywhere from $125 to $450 per vial just as their household income shrank. Read story

Sherry Cianni, left, and Heather James have had to do cancer treatment without friends or family accompanying them because of COVID-19 precautions in place at clinics and hospitals.

In pandemic, breast cancer treatment a sometimes solo flight for Vancouver women

Sherry Cianni, left, and Heather James have had to do cancer treatment without friends or family accompanying them because of COVID-19 precautions in place at clinics and hospitals.

October 11, 2020, 6:05am Breast Cancer

Heather James, 50, dropped a dollop of conditioner on her chest while showering. When she wiped it off, she felt a lump. Read story

FILE - In this Monday, Oct. 5, 2020 file photo, President Donald Trump holds his mask after removing it from his face as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House in Washington from the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. He announced he tested positive for the coronavirus on Oct. 2.

Does the federal health information privacy law protect President Trump?

FILE - In this Monday, Oct. 5, 2020 file photo, President Donald Trump holds his mask after removing it from his face as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House in Washington from the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. He announced he tested positive for the coronavirus on Oct. 2.

October 11, 2020, 6:02am Health

Within one day, President Donald Trump announced his COVID diagnosis and was admitted to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for treatment. The flurry of events was stunning, confusing and triggered many questions. What was his prognosis? When was he last tested for COVID-19? What is his viral load? Read story

Laura Thornquist, left, demonstrates how she has been coaching teammates while the coronavirus pandemic has kept them off the lake. She corrects teammate Britten Witherspoon's form as she paddles in a water trough in Thornquist's Woodland backyard.

Members of Catch-22 dragon boat team build fitness, community after breast cancer diagnosis

Laura Thornquist, left, demonstrates how she has been coaching teammates while the coronavirus pandemic has kept them off the lake. She corrects teammate Britten Witherspoon's form as she paddles in a water trough in Thornquist's Woodland backyard.

October 11, 2020, 6:00am Breast Cancer

“You should try dragon boating.” That’s what Britten Witherspoon, 43, kept hearing from other members of her support group for young breast cancer survivors. Read story

"Mommy Found A Lump" is a children's picture book about breast cancer diagnosis and treatment by Portland surgeon Nathalie Johnson.

How to talk to children about cancer

"Mommy Found A Lump" is a children's picture book about breast cancer diagnosis and treatment by Portland surgeon Nathalie Johnson.

October 11, 2020, 5:21am Breast Cancer

Figuring out what’s really up with your parents is child’s play. Just check their text messages or eavesdrop on a phone call. That’s what one child whispered during a support group hosted by oncology social worker Krista Nelson at Portland’s Providence Cancer Institute. Read story

(iStock.com)

Breast cancer survivors share wisdom: Get support. Accept help. Stay strong. Never give up

(iStock.com)

October 11, 2020, 5:19am Breast Cancer

Facing a breast cancer diagnosis and treatment — especially during a pandemic — can be a frightening prospect. Read story