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A cart carries a sign that reads "Community Vaccination Site," past a photo of a Seattle Seahawks fan, Saturday, March 13, 2021, on the first day of operation of a mass COVID-19 vaccination site at the Lumen Field Events Center in Seattle, which adjoins the field where the NFL football Seahawks and the MLS soccer Seattle Sounders play their games. The site, which is the largest civilian-run vaccination site in the country, will operate only a few days a week until city and county officials can get more doses of the vaccine. (AP Photo/Ted S.

Spend an afternoon with Seattle’s COVID ‘vaccine chasers’

A cart carries a sign that reads "Community Vaccination Site," past a photo of a Seattle Seahawks fan, Saturday, March 13, 2021, on the first day of operation of a mass COVID-19 vaccination site at the Lumen Field Events Center in Seattle, which adjoins the field where the NFL football Seahawks and the MLS soccer Seattle Sounders play their games. The site, which is the largest civilian-run vaccination site in the country, will operate only a few days a week until city and county officials can get more doses of the vaccine. (AP Photo/Ted S.

March 28, 2021, 6:00am Health

Ten minutes before 4 p.m., a crowd of a dozen people stood socially distanced in a Rainier Beach parking lot Monday, engaging in several rounds of polite, very 2021-specific chitchat: Read story

Juli Fisher of Vancouver, who is still struggling with COVID-19 symptoms a year after contracting COVID-19, pushes physical therapist Ryan Nall around the room at Proactive Physical Therapy Specialists in Vancouver. Fisher, who is a nurse, is working to improve her capacity to push patients in a wheelchair.

Juli Fisher reports chronic COVID-19 symptoms one year after infection

Juli Fisher of Vancouver, who is still struggling with COVID-19 symptoms a year after contracting COVID-19, pushes physical therapist Ryan Nall around the room at Proactive Physical Therapy Specialists in Vancouver. Fisher, who is a nurse, is working to improve her capacity to push patients in a wheelchair.

March 27, 2021, 2:20pm Clark County News

Juli Fisher’s life is reflected in her before-and-after photos. Read story

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Clark County adds 37 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths on Friday

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March 26, 2021, 11:36am Clark County Health

Clark County recorded 37 new COVID-19 cases and no new deaths Friday as disease activity rose slightly after holding steady for two weeks, according to data from Clark County Public Health. Read story

In this Wednesday, March 24, 2021 image from video provided by Duke Health, Alejandra Gerardo, 9, looks up to her mom, Dr. Susanna Naggie, as she gets the first of two Pfizer COVID-19 vaccinations during a clinical trial for children at Duke Health in Durham, N.C. In the U.S. and abroad, researchers are beginning to test younger and younger kids, to make sure the shots are safe and work for each age.

Shots in little arms: COVID-19 vaccine testing turns to kids

In this Wednesday, March 24, 2021 image from video provided by Duke Health, Alejandra Gerardo, 9, looks up to her mom, Dr. Susanna Naggie, as she gets the first of two Pfizer COVID-19 vaccinations during a clinical trial for children at Duke Health in Durham, N.C. In the U.S. and abroad, researchers are beginning to test younger and younger kids, to make sure the shots are safe and work for each age.

March 26, 2021, 8:13am Business

The 9-year-old twins didn’t flinch as each received test doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine -- and then a sparkly bandage to cover the spot. Read story

Brant McAdams, left, football coach at Pacific Lutheran, wears personal protective equipment as he prepares COVID-19 tests for student athletes Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, on campus in Tacoma, Wash. There was never a chapter in any of the books on becoming a small NCAA college football coach that addressed administering COVID-19 tests in the midst of a pandemic, but now it's something he's doing to give his players the chance at a season. (AP Photo/Ted S.

Washington’s COVID-19 case count flattening, increasing in some counties

Brant McAdams, left, football coach at Pacific Lutheran, wears personal protective equipment as he prepares COVID-19 tests for student athletes Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, on campus in Tacoma, Wash. There was never a chapter in any of the books on becoming a small NCAA college football coach that addressed administering COVID-19 tests in the midst of a pandemic, but now it's something he's doing to give his players the chance at a season. (AP Photo/Ted S.

March 26, 2021, 8:06am Health

Two important numbers relating to the coronavirus pandemic are going in different directions, one positive and one negative. Read story

Pink Lemonade, others pick up Komen’s breast cancer work

March 26, 2021, 6:03am Clark County Health

As Susan G. Komen Oregon & Southwest Washington closes its local offices at the end of March, the organization is contributing $200,000 in legacy gifts and program seed funding to local breast cancer organizations. Read story

Health officials monitoring 23 people in Washington for Ebola virus disease

March 25, 2021, 7:18pm Health

OLYMPIA — Public health officials in Washington are monitoring 23 people for Ebola who recently traveled from the West African countries of Guinea and Democratic Republic of the Congo. Read story

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Clark County reports 30 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths on Thursday

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March 25, 2021, 1:54pm Clark County Health

Clark County recorded 30 new COVID-19 cases and no new deaths on Thursday, according to the latest data from Clark County Public Health. Read story

Vaccination race enlists grassroots aides to fight mistrust

March 25, 2021, 10:25am Health

CHICAGO (AP) — His last job was selling cars, but in his new gig, working to turn the tide against a pandemic, Herman Simmons knows not to be too pushy or overbearing. Read story

FILE - In this Wednesday, March 24, 2021 file photo, a vial of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccination on a table prior to Croatia's Parliament Speaker Gordan Jandrokovic and Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic being vaccinated, in Zagreb, Croatia. AstraZeneca says that its COVID-19 vaccine is strongly effective even after counting additional illnesses in its disputed U.S. study. The announcement late Wednesday was the latest in an extraordinary public rift with American officials. The drugmaker said it had recalculated data from that study and concluded the vaccine is 76% effective in preventing symptomatic COVID-19, instead of the 79% it had reported earlier in the week.

AstraZeneca confirms strong vaccine protection after U.S. rift

FILE - In this Wednesday, March 24, 2021 file photo, a vial of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccination on a table prior to Croatia's Parliament Speaker Gordan Jandrokovic and Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic being vaccinated, in Zagreb, Croatia. AstraZeneca says that its COVID-19 vaccine is strongly effective even after counting additional illnesses in its disputed U.S. study. The announcement late Wednesday was the latest in an extraordinary public rift with American officials. The drugmaker said it had recalculated data from that study and concluded the vaccine is 76% effective in preventing symptomatic COVID-19, instead of the 79% it had reported earlier in the week.

March 25, 2021, 9:14am Business

AstraZeneca insisted that its COVID-19 vaccine provides strong protection even after counting additional illnesses in its U.S. study, as the drugmaker responded to concerns raised by American officials in an unusually public rebuke that threatened to further erode confidence in the shot. Read story