Thursday, December 2, 2021
Dec. 2, 2021

Linkedin Pinterest

Business

Business BriefsClark County BusinessColumnistsTransactionsWorking in Clark County

Offices, apartments eyed for Terminal 1 at Port of Vancouver

December 1, 2021, 6:03am Business

Initial plans released for the Port of Vancouver’s Blocks One and Two along the city’s waterfront show the areas may soon be home to a 10-story office building and four… Read story

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella sells half his shares in the company

December 1, 2021, 7:40am Business

SEATTLE ± Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella sold more than half his shares in the Redmond tech giant last week in a $285 million transaction that some suspect was timed to… Read story

Powell: Fed ‘not at all sure’ inflation will fade next year

December 1, 2021, 7:03pm Business

WASHINGTON — In a fresh sign of his growing concerns about inflation, Chair Jerome Powell said Wednesday that the Federal Reserve can’t be sure that price increases will slow in the second half of next year as many economists expect. Read story

Norway's battery cell start-up Freyr is listed at the New York Stock Exchange, July 8, 2021. Stocks are opening higher on Wall Street Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021 as traders get back to buying a day after the Federal Reserve jolted markets with news that it would consider pulling back on its support for markets and the economy sooner than previously anticipated.

Markets turn cautious, reversing an early gain to end lower

Norway's battery cell start-up Freyr is listed at the New York Stock Exchange, July 8, 2021. Stocks are opening higher on Wall Street Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021 as traders get back to buying a day after the Federal Reserve jolted markets with news that it would consider pulling back on its support for markets and the economy sooner than previously anticipated.

December 1, 2021, 1:46pm Business

Markets turned cautious again, erasing and early gain and ending lower as investors try to handicap how much the new coronavirus variant will impact the economy. Read story

FILE - Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen leaves after giving evidence to the joint committee for the Draft Online Safety Bill, as part of British government plans for social media regulation, at the Houses of Parliament, in London, Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. After Haugen revealed Facebook's failings to curb online hate and extremism and protect young users from harmful content, U.S. lawmakers are putting forward proposals to curb social media giants by limiting their free-speech protections against legal liability.

Haugen urges lawmakers to avert impasse on social media laws

FILE - Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen leaves after giving evidence to the joint committee for the Draft Online Safety Bill, as part of British government plans for social media regulation, at the Houses of Parliament, in London, Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. After Haugen revealed Facebook's failings to curb online hate and extremism and protect young users from harmful content, U.S. lawmakers are putting forward proposals to curb social media giants by limiting their free-speech protections against legal liability.

December 1, 2021, 9:35am Business

WASHINGTON — Ex-Facebook employee and whistleblower Frances Haugen implored lawmakers Wednesday to avert the usual congressional stalemates as they weigh proposals to curb abuses on social media platforms by limiting the companies’ free-speech protections against legal liability. Read story

An American pilgrim walks to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, where many Christians believe Jesus was crucified, buried and rose from the dead, in the Old City of Jerusalem, Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2021. As countries shut their doors to foreign tourists or reimpose restrictions because of the new omicron variant of the coronavirus, tourism that was just finding it's footing again could face another major pandemic slowdown amid the uncertainty about the new strain.

Omicron unravels travel industry’s plans for a comeback

An American pilgrim walks to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, where many Christians believe Jesus was crucified, buried and rose from the dead, in the Old City of Jerusalem, Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2021. As countries shut their doors to foreign tourists or reimpose restrictions because of the new omicron variant of the coronavirus, tourism that was just finding it's footing again could face another major pandemic slowdown amid the uncertainty about the new strain.

December 1, 2021, 7:43am Business

Tourism businesses that were just finding their footing after nearly two years of devastation wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic are being rattled again as countries throw up new barriers to travel in an effort to contain the omicron variant. Read story

Greg Fisher scans inventory in Wheel Pros' supply warehouse on Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2021, in Greenwood Village, Colo. The company, which designs and manufacturers specialized wheels for off-road vehicles, is struggling like all businesses these days with the disrupted supply chain. (Kevin J.

U.S. manufacturing activity grows in November

Greg Fisher scans inventory in Wheel Pros' supply warehouse on Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2021, in Greenwood Village, Colo. The company, which designs and manufacturers specialized wheels for off-road vehicles, is struggling like all businesses these days with the disrupted supply chain. (Kevin J.

December 1, 2021, 7:40am Business

SILVER SPRING, Md. — U.S. manufacturing activity grew at a faster pace in November as companies try to keep up with demand amid ongoing supply shortages and delays. Read story

Stocks sink as omicron, rate worries rattle Wall Street

November 30, 2021, 1:08pm Business

NEW YORK — Already unnerved by the newest coronavirus variant, Wall Street's losses deepened on Tuesday after the head of the Federal Reserve said it will consider shutting off its support for financial markets sooner than expected. Read story

A homes sale sign is shown in front of a new home construction site in Northbrook, Ill., Wednesday, June 23, 2021. U.S. home prices rose briskly in September, another sign that the housing market is booming in the aftermath of last year's coronavirus recession. (AP Photo/Nam Y.

U.S. home prices register 19.1% annual gain in September

A homes sale sign is shown in front of a new home construction site in Northbrook, Ill., Wednesday, June 23, 2021. U.S. home prices rose briskly in September, another sign that the housing market is booming in the aftermath of last year's coronavirus recession. (AP Photo/Nam Y.

November 30, 2021, 7:44am Business

WASHINGTON — U.S. home prices rose briskly in September, another sign that the housing market is booming in the aftermath of last year’s coronavirus recession. Read story

FILE - This March 29, 2018 file photo shows the Facebook logo on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. The United Kingdom's antitrust watchdog has blocked Facebook's acquisition of GIF-sharing platform Giphy and ordered the social network to reverse the deal. It said Tuesday that the deal hurts social media users and advertisers by stifling competition for animated images.

UK competition watchdog orders Facebook to sell off Giphy

FILE - This March 29, 2018 file photo shows the Facebook logo on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. The United Kingdom's antitrust watchdog has blocked Facebook's acquisition of GIF-sharing platform Giphy and ordered the social network to reverse the deal. It said Tuesday that the deal hurts social media users and advertisers by stifling competition for animated images.

November 30, 2021, 7:43am Business

LONDON — The United Kingdom’s antitrust watchdog has blocked Facebook’s acquisition of Giphy and ordered the social network to sell off the GIF-sharing platform, saying the deal hurts social media users and advertisers by stifling competition for animated images. Read story