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May 17, 2021

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Dan Christopher, Klickitat County commissioner, talks with solar critics picketing across from the Goldendale Post Office.

Solar farms booming in Washington, but where should they go?

Dan Christopher, Klickitat County commissioner, talks with solar critics picketing across from the Goldendale Post Office.

May 10, 2021, 6:03am Business

GOLDENDALE — In September 2018, Russ and Amy Hanson received an unsolicited offer from Invenergy to cover their land near this south central Washington town with solar panels. Read story

The Week Ahead: Prices in the pipeline

May 10, 2021, 6:00am Business

Lumber, corn and copper prices have been jumping this year. Future prices of all kinds of commodities have been rallying, including coffee, wheat and oil. It’s supply and demand, yes, but also the inflation trade. Read story

Ruth Palacios and Arturo Xelo, a married couple from Mexico, work at their fruit stand in the Corona neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York on Tuesday, April 13, 2021. They worked seven days a week for months disinfecting COVID-19 patient rooms at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, but weren't paid overtime Palacios says. The couple filed a federal lawsuit against the contractor that hired them, alleging their pay was cut without their knowledge from $15 an hour to $12.25. They're now selling fruit to make ends meet.

How companies rip off poor employees — and get away with it

Ruth Palacios and Arturo Xelo, a married couple from Mexico, work at their fruit stand in the Corona neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York on Tuesday, April 13, 2021. They worked seven days a week for months disinfecting COVID-19 patient rooms at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, but weren't paid overtime Palacios says. The couple filed a federal lawsuit against the contractor that hired them, alleging their pay was cut without their knowledge from $15 an hour to $12.25. They're now selling fruit to make ends meet.

May 10, 2021, 6:00am Business

Already battered by long shifts and high infection rates, essential workers struggling through the pandemic face another hazard of hard times: employers who steal their wages. Read story

Larry Gossett, a former King County Council member, says his father was told he could not buy a house in West Seattle because of his race. Gossett is shown during his election night gathering at Emerald Community Church in Seattle.

Racist restrictions in old home deeds across Washington will get expanded scrutiny

Larry Gossett, a former King County Council member, says his father was told he could not buy a house in West Seattle because of his race. Gossett is shown during his election night gathering at Emerald Community Church in Seattle.

May 10, 2021, 6:00am Business

SEATTLE — Marlene Smick remembers sitting in the back seat of her parents’ car in 1958 as the family spotted an open house sign in Seward Park. Smick’s father, a second-generation Japanese-American who had been incarcerated during World War II, rolled down the window to ask about the property. Read story

Wage theft: His paycheck bounced. It got worse from there.

May 10, 2021, 6:00am Business

On a Tuesday afternoon last June, Humberto was yanking old wires from the walls of a middle school in suburban Birmingham, Alabama, when his cellphone rang. Read story

A protester wearing a mask depicting French President Emmanuel Macron holds a bord reading << Liable for climate inaction >> during a rally against the climate change in Paris, Sunday, May 9, 2021. Thousands of French demonstrators took to the streets of Paris and other cities on Sunday to call for more ambitious measures to fight against climate change.

French demonstrators demand more action on climate change

A protester wearing a mask depicting French President Emmanuel Macron holds a bord reading << Liable for climate inaction >> during a rally against the climate change in Paris, Sunday, May 9, 2021. Thousands of French demonstrators took to the streets of Paris and other cities on Sunday to call for more ambitious measures to fight against climate change.

May 9, 2021, 4:52pm Business

PARIS — Thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of Paris and other French cities on Sunday to call for more ambitious measures in the fight against climate change. Read story

FILE - In this Sept. 8, 2008 file photo traffic on I-95 passes oil storage tanks owned by the Colonial Pipeline Company in Linden, N.J. A major pipeline that transports fuels along the East Coast says it had to stop operations because it was the victim of a cyberattack.

Cyberattack on U.S. pipeline is linked to criminal gang

FILE - In this Sept. 8, 2008 file photo traffic on I-95 passes oil storage tanks owned by the Colonial Pipeline Company in Linden, N.J. A major pipeline that transports fuels along the East Coast says it had to stop operations because it was the victim of a cyberattack.

May 9, 2021, 1:30pm Business

NEW YORK — The cyberextortion attempt that has forced the shutdown of a vital U.S. pipeline was carried out by a criminal gang known as DarkSide that cultivates a Robin Hood image of stealing from corporations and giving a cut to charity, a person close to the investigation said Sunday. Read story

Lucius Giannini stands for a portrait Thursday, April 15, 2021, in San Diego. Giannini graduated from the University of California at San Diego at the end of last summer with a degree in political science. He had hoped to find work with the Peace Corps, or maybe teaching English overseas. But the Peace Corps was bringing all its volunteers home, and no one was hiring for overseas teaching.

Job market for new grads: Much hiring but much competition

Lucius Giannini stands for a portrait Thursday, April 15, 2021, in San Diego. Giannini graduated from the University of California at San Diego at the end of last summer with a degree in political science. He had hoped to find work with the Peace Corps, or maybe teaching English overseas. But the Peace Corps was bringing all its volunteers home, and no one was hiring for overseas teaching.

May 9, 2021, 1:28pm Business

After a painful year of joblessness, the future has finally brightened for Alycia St. Germain, a 22-year-old college senior at the University of Minnesota. Read story

Oregon and Washington are two years into a renewed effort to replace the Interstate 5 Bridge, eight years after the collapse of the Columbia River Crossing project. The project office is currently developing the Purpose and Need and Vision and Values statements for the new bridge, which will help evaluate the different configuration options to arrive at a preferred version.

Funding, reuse of CRC work key issues in Interstate 5 Bridge replacement

Oregon and Washington are two years into a renewed effort to replace the Interstate 5 Bridge, eight years after the collapse of the Columbia River Crossing project. The project office is currently developing the Purpose and Need and Vision and Values statements for the new bridge, which will help evaluate the different configuration options to arrive at a preferred version.

May 9, 2021, 6:05am Business

It was funding that killed the Columbia River Crossing. The original Interstate 5 Bridge replacement project was already embroiled in controversy, but the killing blow came when the Washington Senate adjourned without approving the state’s portion of the project funding in 2013. Read story

A northbound Yellow Line Max train, left, stops at the Killingsworth station in Portland, and an articulated hybrid bus, right, of the type used on C-Tran's bus rapid transit route, The Vine, is seen in Vancouver.  The question of whether TriMet's Yellow Line should be extended to Vancouver was a key point of contention during development of the Columbia River Crossing project and is often cited as one of the main disagreements that derailed the project. The current renewed replacement effort will consider both light rail and bus rapid transit options to meet the project's high-capacity transit needs, and no decision has been made yet - but recent comments from federal lawmakers pushed the still-simmering disagreement back into the spotlight.

New bridge replacement effort strives to avoid light rail controversy

A northbound Yellow Line Max train, left, stops at the Killingsworth station in Portland, and an articulated hybrid bus, right, of the type used on C-Tran's bus rapid transit route, The Vine, is seen in Vancouver.  The question of whether TriMet's Yellow Line should be extended to Vancouver was a key point of contention during development of the Columbia River Crossing project and is often cited as one of the main disagreements that derailed the project. The current renewed replacement effort will consider both light rail and bus rapid transit options to meet the project's high-capacity transit needs, and no decision has been made yet - but recent comments from federal lawmakers pushed the still-simmering disagreement back into the spotlight.

May 9, 2021, 6:05am Business

Recent headlines about the Interstate 5 Bridge replacement effort have chronicled the reemergence of one of the biggest sticking points from Columbia River Crossing era: light rail. Read story