Tuesday, September 22, 2020
Sept. 22, 2020

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39 of 42 Burgerville restaurants reopen

September 17, 2020, 6:09pm Business

Vancouver-based fast food chain Burgerville announced Thursday that it has reopened 39 of its 42 locations for drive-thru service. Read story

The Vancouver Public Schools Administrative Services building.

Clark County jobless claims fall, but more slowly

The Vancouver Public Schools Administrative Services building.

September 17, 2020, 6:04pm Business

Unemployment insurance claims in Clark County continued a downward trend last week, but the rate of decline is slowing. Read story

A "For Sale" sign is posted outside a home on Northeast 133rd Way on Thursday morning.

Shortage of inventory hikes Clark County real estate prices

A "For Sale" sign is posted outside a home on Northeast 133rd Way on Thursday morning.

September 17, 2020, 4:18pm Business

Clark County’s residential housing market saw drops in closed sales and new listings in August, coupled with a continued rise in pending sales that contributed to a continuing shortage of market inventory. Read story

This Sept. 4, 2020, photo, shows Regio, a Mexican toilet paper brand, on the shelf at a CVS in New York. Demand for toilet paper has been so high during the pandemic that in order to keep their shelves stocked, retailers across the country are buying up foreign toilet paper brands, mostly from Mexico.

Petalo, not Charmin: Virus brings Mexican toilet paper to U.S.

This Sept. 4, 2020, photo, shows Regio, a Mexican toilet paper brand, on the shelf at a CVS in New York. Demand for toilet paper has been so high during the pandemic that in order to keep their shelves stocked, retailers across the country are buying up foreign toilet paper brands, mostly from Mexico.

September 17, 2020, 2:45pm Business

NEW YORK — Toilet paper is back on store shelves. But you may not recognize some of the brands. Read story

FILE - In this Jan. 3, 2020 file photo, the Wall St. street sign is framed by American flags flying outside the New York Stock Exchange in New York.  Stocks are falling early on Wall Street Thursday, Sept. 17,  as the late selling from the previous day carries over.

Wall Street slumps as Big Tech once again leads decliners

FILE - In this Jan. 3, 2020 file photo, the Wall St. street sign is framed by American flags flying outside the New York Stock Exchange in New York.  Stocks are falling early on Wall Street Thursday, Sept. 17,  as the late selling from the previous day carries over.

September 17, 2020, 10:52am Business

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks are lower Thursday, led by big technology names, as Wall Street continues to swirl after the Federal Reserve said it will keep interest rates at nearly zero for years to help nurse the wheezing economy. Read story

Hair and makeup artists are cut as Fox News trims staff in reorganization

September 17, 2020, 10:52am Business

Ever since the coronavirus outbreak forced many TV news anchors, correspondents and guests to broadcast from home, many of them have gone without the services of hair and makeup artists that made them camera ready. Read story

Workers toil on a multifamily dwelling Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020, in Winter Park, Colo.   The Commerce Department reported Tuesday, Aug. 18, construction of new U.S. homes surged 22.6 percent last month as homebuilders continued to bounce back from the coronavirus pandemic.

August U.S. home building slides 5.1 percent after months of gains

Workers toil on a multifamily dwelling Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020, in Winter Park, Colo.   The Commerce Department reported Tuesday, Aug. 18, construction of new U.S. homes surged 22.6 percent last month as homebuilders continued to bounce back from the coronavirus pandemic.

September 17, 2020, 10:31am Business

WASHINGTON — U.S. housing construction fell a surprising 5.1 percent in August after three months of strong gains when home builders ramped up projects following a pandemic-induced shutdown in March and April. Read story

FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2020, file photo, a help wanted sign hangs on the door of a Target store in Uniontown, Pa. Hundreds of thousands of Americans likely applied for unemployment benefits last week, a high level of job insecurity that reflects economic damage from the coronavirus outbreak. Economists expect that 850,000 people sought jobless aid, down from 884,000 the week before, according to a survey by the data firm FactSet. (AP Photo/Gene J.

COVID-19 danger continues to drive joblessness in U.S.

FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2020, file photo, a help wanted sign hangs on the door of a Target store in Uniontown, Pa. Hundreds of thousands of Americans likely applied for unemployment benefits last week, a high level of job insecurity that reflects economic damage from the coronavirus outbreak. Economists expect that 850,000 people sought jobless aid, down from 884,000 the week before, according to a survey by the data firm FactSet. (AP Photo/Gene J.

September 17, 2020, 10:22am Business

WASHINGTON — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell last week to 860,000, a historically high number of people that illustrates the broad economic damage still taking place nine months after the first case of COVID-19 was detected in the U.S. Read story

Beaches restaurant has had revenue cut in half as customers wouldn't sit outside with the recent wildfire smoke. The issue of unavailable outdoor seating will likely plague restaurants once the weather starts getting cold, windy and rainy.

Plight thickens for Clark County restaurants

Beaches restaurant has had revenue cut in half as customers wouldn't sit outside with the recent wildfire smoke. The issue of unavailable outdoor seating will likely plague restaurants once the weather starts getting cold, windy and rainy.

September 17, 2020, 6:04am Business

This past week, smoke lingering in Clark County has given restaurants a bitter taste of the lost business they’re expecting when outdoor seating disappears in the colder months to come. Read story

FILE - In this June 30, 2020, file photo Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell, reflected in the sneeze guard set up between himself and members of the House Committee on Financial Services, speaks during a hearing on oversight of the Treasury Department and Federal Reserve pandemic response on Capitol Hill in Washington.  The Federal Reserve adjusted its inflation target to seek price increases above 2% annually, a move that will likely keep interest rates low for years to come.  The Fed on Wednesday, Sept. 16,  also left its benchmark short-term rate unchanged at nearly zero, where it has been since the pandemic intensified in March.

Federal Reserve sees rates near zero at least through 2023

FILE - In this June 30, 2020, file photo Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell, reflected in the sneeze guard set up between himself and members of the House Committee on Financial Services, speaks during a hearing on oversight of the Treasury Department and Federal Reserve pandemic response on Capitol Hill in Washington.  The Federal Reserve adjusted its inflation target to seek price increases above 2% annually, a move that will likely keep interest rates low for years to come.  The Fed on Wednesday, Sept. 16,  also left its benchmark short-term rate unchanged at nearly zero, where it has been since the pandemic intensified in March.

September 16, 2020, 2:57pm Business

WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve expects to keep its benchmark interest rate pegged near zero at least through 2023 as it strives to accelerate economic growth and drive down the unemployment rate. Read story