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Jan. 26, 2022

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An illustration of the outer coating of the Epstein-Barr virus. (U.S.

More evidence ties Epstein-Barr virus to multiple sclerosis

An illustration of the outer coating of the Epstein-Barr virus. (U.S.

January 18, 2022, 6:02am Health

There’s more evidence that one of the world’s most common viruses may set some people on the path to developing multiple sclerosis. Read story

Fauci: Too soon to say if omicron heralds pandemic’s end

January 17, 2022, 7:06pm Health

Anthony Fauci, the top medical adviser to the U.S. president, said it’s too soon to say whether the omicron variant will herald a shift in the COVID-19 pandemic to endemic. Read story

States are required to set up transportation to medical appointments for adults, children and people with disabilities in the Medicaid health insurance program.

Left behind: Medicaid patients say rides to doctors don’t always come

States are required to set up transportation to medical appointments for adults, children and people with disabilities in the Medicaid health insurance program.

January 16, 2022, 6:02am Health

Tranisha Rockmore and her daughter Karisma waited at an Atlanta children’s hospital in July for their ride home. Read story

Carlazjion Constant of Smyrna, Tennessee, used the Upsolve app to help her declare Chapter 7 bankruptcy in 2021 after her high-deductible health insurance left her with about $5,000 in bills from a complicated pregnancy, on top of a real estate company garnishing her wages. Bankruptcy lawyers often charge $1,500 or more, but the nonprofit's app eliminated much of the cost of filing for her financial reset.

App attempts to break barriers to bankruptcy for those in medical debt

Carlazjion Constant of Smyrna, Tennessee, used the Upsolve app to help her declare Chapter 7 bankruptcy in 2021 after her high-deductible health insurance left her with about $5,000 in bills from a complicated pregnancy, on top of a real estate company garnishing her wages. Bankruptcy lawyers often charge $1,500 or more, but the nonprofit's app eliminated much of the cost of filing for her financial reset.

January 16, 2022, 6:00am Business

An unplanned and complicated pregnancy pushed Carlazjion Constant of Smyrna, Tennessee, to the financial brink. Read story

FILE - People wait in line at a COVID-19 testing site in Times Square, New York, Monday, Dec. 13, 2021. Scientists are warning that omicron's lightning-fast spread across the globe practically ensures it won't be the last worrisome coronavirus variant. And there's no guarantee the next ones will cause milder illness or that vaccines will work against them.

Expect more worrisome variants after omicron, scientists say

FILE - People wait in line at a COVID-19 testing site in Times Square, New York, Monday, Dec. 13, 2021. Scientists are warning that omicron's lightning-fast spread across the globe practically ensures it won't be the last worrisome coronavirus variant. And there's no guarantee the next ones will cause milder illness or that vaccines will work against them.

January 15, 2022, 1:03pm Health

Get ready to learn more Greek letters. Scientists warn that omicron’s whirlwind advance practically ensures it won’t be the last version of the coronavirus to worry the world. Read story

A worker at a drive-up COVID-19 testing clinic in Puyallup puts a nose swab into a tube of liquid. People who think they may have COVID-19 are urged to visit testing sites, not emergency rooms, to get a test. (Ted S.

Clark County health officials offer guidelines for what to do if you think you have omicron

A worker at a drive-up COVID-19 testing clinic in Puyallup puts a nose swab into a tube of liquid. People who think they may have COVID-19 are urged to visit testing sites, not emergency rooms, to get a test. (Ted S.

January 15, 2022, 6:09am Clark County Health

Clark County hospitals are slammed with people testing positive for COVID-19, and public health officials worry that they will soon be overwhelmed. Read story

President Joe Biden begins to speak Friday about the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law at the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House Campus in Washington.

President advocates for vaccines

President Joe Biden begins to speak Friday about the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law at the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House Campus in Washington.

January 14, 2022, 5:44pm Health

Concerned but not giving up, President Joe Biden is anxiously pushing ahead to prod people to get COVID-19 shots after the Supreme Court put a halt to the administration’s sweeping vaccinate-or-test plan for large employers. Read story

Registered nurse Scott McGieson wears an N95 mask as he walks out of a patient's room in the acute care unit of Harborview Medical Center, Friday, Jan. 14, 2022, in Seattle. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is deploying 100 members of the state National Guard to hospitals across the state amid staff shortages due to an omicron-fueled spike in COVID-19 hospitalizations. Inslee announced Thursday that teams will be deployed to assist four overcrowded emergency departments at hospitals in Everett, Yakima, Wenatchee and Spokane, and that testing teams will be based at hospitals in Olympia, Richland, Seattle and Tacoma.

CDC encourages more Americans to consider N95 masks

Registered nurse Scott McGieson wears an N95 mask as he walks out of a patient's room in the acute care unit of Harborview Medical Center, Friday, Jan. 14, 2022, in Seattle. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is deploying 100 members of the state National Guard to hospitals across the state amid staff shortages due to an omicron-fueled spike in COVID-19 hospitalizations. Inslee announced Thursday that teams will be deployed to assist four overcrowded emergency departments at hospitals in Everett, Yakima, Wenatchee and Spokane, and that testing teams will be based at hospitals in Olympia, Richland, Seattle and Tacoma.

January 14, 2022, 2:59pm Health

U.S. health officials on Friday encouraged more Americans to wear the kind of N95 or KN95 masks used by health-care workers to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Read story