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Sept. 19, 2020

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Survey: Number of uninsured Americans increased in 2019

September 9, 2020, 11:07am Health

WASHINGTON — Roughly 33.2 million Americans, or 10.3 percent, lacked health insurance in 2019, according to new data released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read story

Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health, attends a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing to discuss vaccines and protecting public health during the coronavirus pandemic on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020, in Washington.

Halted vaccine study shows ‘no compromises’ on safety

Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health, attends a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing to discuss vaccines and protecting public health during the coronavirus pandemic on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020, in Washington.

September 9, 2020, 10:23am Health

AstraZeneca’s suspension of final testing of its potential COVID-19 vaccine while it investigates a volunteer’s illness shows there will be “no compromises” on safety in developing the shots, the chief of the National Institutes of Health told Congress on Wednesday. Read story

Spit in a tube or a swab in the nose? Saliva shows promise in COVID test debate

September 8, 2020, 11:52am Health

Two new studies made the case recently for an alternative to the invasive COVID-19 tests that require collecting a sample from deep in the nose. Saliva samples, both studies found, were nearly as reliable and far less of a hassle. Read story

Clark County adds 82 new COVID-19 cases, one new death over holiday weekend

September 8, 2020, 11:33am Clark County Health

Clark County Public Health reported 82 new COVID-19 cases and one new death Tuesday in an expanded tally from the Labor Day weekend. Read story

FILE - In this Monday, July 27, 2020 file photo, a nurse prepares a shot as a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., gets underway in Binghamton, N.Y. On Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020, the top executives of nine drugmakers likely to produce the first vaccines against the new coronavirus said that they will stick to the highest ethical and scientific standards in testing and manufacturing and will make the well-being of those getting vaccinated their top priority.

Companies testing vaccines pledge safety, high standards

FILE - In this Monday, July 27, 2020 file photo, a nurse prepares a shot as a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., gets underway in Binghamton, N.Y. On Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020, the top executives of nine drugmakers likely to produce the first vaccines against the new coronavirus said that they will stick to the highest ethical and scientific standards in testing and manufacturing and will make the well-being of those getting vaccinated their top priority.

September 8, 2020, 10:31am Business

The top executives of nine drugmakers likely to produce the first vaccines against the new coronavirus signed an unprecedented pledge meant to boost public confidence in any approved vaccines. Read story

FILE - This 2020 electron microscope image made available by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 particle isolated from a patient, in a laboratory in Fort Detrick, Md. Coronaviruses, including the newest one, are named for the spikes that cover their outer surface like a crown, or corona in Latin. Using those club-shaped spikes, the virus latches on to the outer wall of a human cell, invades it and replicates, creating viruses to hijack more cells.

Doctors studying why obesity may be tied to serious COVID-19

FILE - This 2020 electron microscope image made available by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 particle isolated from a patient, in a laboratory in Fort Detrick, Md. Coronaviruses, including the newest one, are named for the spikes that cover their outer surface like a crown, or corona in Latin. Using those club-shaped spikes, the virus latches on to the outer wall of a human cell, invades it and replicates, creating viruses to hijack more cells.

September 8, 2020, 10:26am Health

NEW YORK — In the early days of the pandemic, doctors noticed something about the people severely ill from COVID-19: Many were obese. Read story

Facts about vaccines and what people need to know

September 8, 2020, 6:02am Health

Vaccines save lives. That’s the message Dr. Priya Sampathkumar, an infectious diseases specialist at Mayo Clinic, wants the public to know. Read story

Mindfulness and meditation practices like qi gong can help caregivers avoid burnout and boost their resilience.

Meditation, mindfulness can ease caregivers’ stress

Mindfulness and meditation practices like qi gong can help caregivers avoid burnout and boost their resilience.

September 8, 2020, 6:00am Health

FORT WORTH, Texas — Come evening, neighbors might see Richard Giltner gracefully moving his arms in his Fort Worth front yard. Read story

Honeybee venom kills breast cancer

September 8, 2020, 6:00am Breast Cancer

SYDNEY, Australia — The venom from European honeybees has been found to be “remarkably effective” at killing hard-to-treat aggressive breast cancer cells, according to researchers in Western Australia. Read story

FILE - In this Tuesday, May 5, 2020 file photo, a health worker draws blood from a patient for a COVID-19 coronavirus antibody test in DeLand, Fla. Scientists are still working to figure out how well antibodies for the new coronavirus may shield someone from another infection, or how long that protection might last.

Bold hopes for virus antibody tests still unfulfilled

FILE - In this Tuesday, May 5, 2020 file photo, a health worker draws blood from a patient for a COVID-19 coronavirus antibody test in DeLand, Fla. Scientists are still working to figure out how well antibodies for the new coronavirus may shield someone from another infection, or how long that protection might last.

September 7, 2020, 10:10am Health

WASHINGTON — At the height of the coronavirus lockdown, President Donald Trump and his top health advisers trumpeted a new test that would help Americans reclaim their lives — one that would tell them if they already had the virus and were protected from getting it again. Read story