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June 18, 2021

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FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020 file photo, Dr. Michael Ryan, executive director of the World Health Organization's Health Emergencies program, speaks during a news conference at the WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland.  Top World Health Organization official Dr. Michael Ryan, said Monday June 7, 2021, he estimates that worldwide COVID-19 vaccination coverage of over 80% is needed to significantly lower the chance that an imported coronavirus case could spawn a cluster or a wider outbreak.

WHO: High vaccination rates can help reduce risk of variants

FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020 file photo, Dr. Michael Ryan, executive director of the World Health Organization's Health Emergencies program, speaks during a news conference at the WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland.  Top World Health Organization official Dr. Michael Ryan, said Monday June 7, 2021, he estimates that worldwide COVID-19 vaccination coverage of over 80% is needed to significantly lower the chance that an imported coronavirus case could spawn a cluster or a wider outbreak.

June 7, 2021, 3:25pm Health

GENEVA — A top World Health Organization official estimated Monday that COVID-19 vaccination coverage of at least 80 percent is needed to significantly lower the risk that “imported” coronavirus cases like those linked to new variants could spawn a cluster or a wider outbreak. Read story

This illustration shows the 2019 Novel Coronavirus.

Clark County records 161 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths, since Friday

This illustration shows the 2019 Novel Coronavirus.

June 7, 2021, 11:18am Clark County Health

Clark County recorded 161 new COVID-19 cases and no new deaths since Friday as a fourth wave of infection continues to show signs of abating. Read story

Rural-urban gap in U.S. death rates tripled even before pandemic, study finds

June 7, 2021, 11:07am Health

The gap between the death rates of rural and urban U.S. residents tripled over the past two decades as city-dwellers enjoyed robust health improvement and drugs and disease pervaded the countryside. Read story

In this 2019 photo provided by Biogen, a researcher works on the development of the medication aducanumab in Cambridge, Mass. On Monday, June 7, 2021, the Food and Drug Administration approved aducanumab, the first new drug for Alzheimer's disease in nearly 20 years, disregarding warnings from independent advisers that the much-debated treatment hasn't been shown to help slow the brain-destroying disease.

FDA approves much-debated Alzheimer’s drug panned by experts

In this 2019 photo provided by Biogen, a researcher works on the development of the medication aducanumab in Cambridge, Mass. On Monday, June 7, 2021, the Food and Drug Administration approved aducanumab, the first new drug for Alzheimer's disease in nearly 20 years, disregarding warnings from independent advisers that the much-debated treatment hasn't been shown to help slow the brain-destroying disease.

June 7, 2021, 10:23am Health

WASHINGTON — Government health officials on Monday approved the first new drug for Alzheimer’s disease in nearly 20 years, disregarding warnings from independent advisers that the much-debated treatment hasn’t been shown to help slow the brain-destroying disease. Read story

Marci Rau, who served as a chaplain at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center in Vancouver during the pandemic, pauses in the hospital's chapel. During the pandemic, Rau has had to find unique ways to connect patients and families during the dying process.

PeaceHealth chaplain has supported patients, families staff during pandemic

Marci Rau, who served as a chaplain at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center in Vancouver during the pandemic, pauses in the hospital's chapel. During the pandemic, Rau has had to find unique ways to connect patients and families during the dying process.

June 7, 2021, 6:05am Clark County Health

Editor’s Note: Marci Rau is a chaplain at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center in Vancouver. Since March 2020, Rau has provided chaplaincy to PeaceHealth’s patients, including COVID-19 patients. As of Thursday evening, PeaceHealth Southwest had 137 COVID-19 deaths, serving as a main treatment hub for the county’s most severe COVID-19 cases.… Read story

A vile containing Pfizer vaccine to be administered on elderly people at the SAVF Evanna Tehuis old age home is seen ahead of a vaccination run near Klerksdorp, on May 19, 2021. South Africa is resuming its COVID-19 coronavirus Phase 2 vaccination roll-out program which targets vulnerable groups who are 60 years and older.

As COVID-19 collides with HIV/AIDS, the pandemic may be taking an ominous turn

A vile containing Pfizer vaccine to be administered on elderly people at the SAVF Evanna Tehuis old age home is seen ahead of a vaccination run near Klerksdorp, on May 19, 2021. South Africa is resuming its COVID-19 coronavirus Phase 2 vaccination roll-out program which targets vulnerable groups who are 60 years and older.

June 7, 2021, 6:00am Health

As the world’s less affluent countries scramble for COVID-19 vaccine and contend with deadly surges of the disease, researchers in South Africa have just documented an ominous development: the collision of the pandemic with HIV/AIDS. Read story

Rebekah Jones in her office at the Florida Department of Health. Jones has been granted whistleblower status in her ongoing battle over COVID-19 data in Florida.

What Rebekah Jones saw behind the scenes at the Florida Department of Health

Rebekah Jones in her office at the Florida Department of Health. Jones has been granted whistleblower status in her ongoing battle over COVID-19 data in Florida.

June 6, 2021, 6:00am Health

MIAMI — Just hours after the police entered her home, guns drawn and warrant to seize her electronics in hand, Rebekah Jones, Florida’s ousted data guru for COVID-19, sent a warning to one of her most secret confidants — Jared Moskowitz, top aide to Gov. Ron DeSantis for the state’s… Read story

FILE - In this Tuesday, March 9, 2021 file photo, Solutions Oriented Addiction Response organizer Brooke Parker holds an HIV testing kit in Charleston, W.Va. The nonprofit group operates health fairs for residents, including syringe exchanges and HIV testing. Some researchers believe COVID-19 has derailed the fight against HIV, siphoning away health workers and other resources and setting back a U.S. campaign to decimate the AIDS epidemic by 2030.

Experts see strides on AIDS, but COVID-19 halted progress

FILE - In this Tuesday, March 9, 2021 file photo, Solutions Oriented Addiction Response organizer Brooke Parker holds an HIV testing kit in Charleston, W.Va. The nonprofit group operates health fairs for residents, including syringe exchanges and HIV testing. Some researchers believe COVID-19 has derailed the fight against HIV, siphoning away health workers and other resources and setting back a U.S. campaign to decimate the AIDS epidemic by 2030.

June 5, 2021, 9:21pm Health

NEW YORK — Some researchers believe COVID-19 has derailed the fight against HIV, siphoning away health workers and other resources and setting back a U.S. campaign to decimate the AIDS epidemic by 2030. Read story

New England’s success against COVID-19 could be a model

June 5, 2021, 9:20pm Health Wire

BOSTON — For Dr. Jeremy Faust, the moment he realized the pandemic no longer dominated his workday came over Memorial Day weekend, when he didn’t see a single coronavirus case over two shifts in the emergency room at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Read story

FILE - In this Saturday, May 15, 2021, file photo, empty vials of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine lie in a box during a vaccine campaign in Ebersberg near Munich, Germany. Health authorities are trying to determine whether heart inflammation that can occur along with many types of infections could also be a rare side effect in teens and young adults after the second dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

Heart reaction probed as possible rare coronavirus vaccine link in teens

FILE - In this Saturday, May 15, 2021, file photo, empty vials of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine lie in a box during a vaccine campaign in Ebersberg near Munich, Germany. Health authorities are trying to determine whether heart inflammation that can occur along with many types of infections could also be a rare side effect in teens and young adults after the second dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

June 5, 2021, 8:14pm Health

Health authorities are trying to determine whether heart inflammation that can occur along with many types of infections could also be a rare side effect in teens and young adults after the second dose of COVID-19 vaccine. Read story