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Aug. 9, 2022

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Working in Clark County: Jeff Iverson, manager at Vanco Golf Range

By , Columbian staff writer
Published:
2 Photos
Jeff Iverson of Vanco Golf Range has been manager in the shop since 2013.
Jeff Iverson of Vanco Golf Range has been manager in the shop since 2013. (Kay Richardson/The Columbian) Photo Gallery

Understatement of the week: Jeff Iverson loves golf. His passion for it goes back to his childhood when he and his three brothers caddied for their dad and uncles on Sundays. Once a pro, he maintains amateur status currently and shares his knowledge and fervor with those who walk in Vanco’s doors looking to improve their game. His advice comes along with a large dose of encouragement. “With golf, you can rent it, but you can never own it,” he says. “The best players don’t win all the time.”

Name: Jeff Iverson.

Job title: Manager, Vanco Golf Range.

Residence neighborhood: Fisher’s Landing.

Employer/business name: Vanco Golf Range. 703 N. Devine, Vancouver. 360-693-8811.

Age: 69.

Educational/professional background: All four years at David Douglas High School in Portland I lettered in golf and after graduation moved to Mesa, Ariz., with my parents. Then I floundered around not sure what I wanted to do. I ended up working at Arizona Golf and Country Club, driving members around and playing in my off time. I came back to Portland in 1965 and joined the Marine Corps Reserve. After meeting my wife and finishing up as a reserve, I read meters for the gas company. I learned my route so well I would get finished quite early in the day — early enough to go play golf!

I played most of the time in weekly “money games” with a men’s club, 32 guys making up eight foursomes. These were guys I could have fun with, playing good golf.

Later I owned my own meat distribution company and ran it for 20 years while raising a family — four sons who all play golf, of course. We still get together to play a couple times a year.

How and when you got started in your business: I turned golf pro in 1992. I wanted to pass on what I had learned about golf from pros I was fortunate enough to know. Because of multiple surgeries, I had to give up my pro status, but filed and got my amateur status back. I can give a “tweak” (advice), but accept no professional pay. I met Chuck Milne, owner of Vanco, through golfing in Portland, and have been here for about three years.

Personal/business philosophy: Slow down long enough to catch the living moment.

Most rewarding part of job: Customers’ excitement over hitting balls and learning swing improvements, either through their own research or through a teaching pro. They are excited when it works right.

Most challenging part of job: Keeping customers involved in learning swing improvements and encouraging them to keep a positive attitude.

One thing you’d like people to know about your work: I’d rather be hitting balls, but I enjoy giving advice and helping people connect with our excellent teaching pros. We’re pretty busy now until September, but since our tees are covered and heated and we have lights, people can come and practice their swings all year round.

Best feature of my Clark County community: Neat and responsible; the people are friendly and they enjoy their lives.

What would make your community a better place: A community center.

What is your favorite travel destination and type: Reno! I like playing cards and the excitement of the deal.

Favorite restaurant/pub/coffee shop/store: Stardust Diner. The food is great and filling. We also like our Starbucks coffee stops.

Hobbies: Golf, of course. I follow the PGA, LPGA and the PGA Senior tours. My sons and I also watch the NFL on Sundays.

Most enjoyable book/play/movie/arts event in past 12 months: Harry Potter series.

Something you’d like to do this year/within five years: Play in some senior pro this summer.

One word to describe yourself: Helpful.

Person you’d most like to meet: I would like to have met Abraham Lincoln.

Columbian staff writer

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