Wednesday, December 11, 2019
Dec. 11, 2019

Linkedin Pinterest

Historic preservation commission honored for its outreach

State lauds county’s engagement with public on heritage

By , Columbian Science, Military & History Reporter
Published: May 3, 2018, 6:00am
2 Photos
The administration building at the 78th Street Heritage Farm. Once the Clark County Poor Farm, it is among the area’s historic properties. Columbian file photos
The administration building at the 78th Street Heritage Farm. Once the Clark County Poor Farm, it is among the area’s historic properties. Columbian file photos Photo Gallery

A Clark County commission is among a dozen winners of the state’s 2018 historic preservation awards.

The Clark County Historic Preservation Commission will be honored in the Preservation Education category for its successful outreach to the public.

The news release from Allyson Brooks, state historic preservation officer, cited the commission’s innovative ways to engage the public in heritage and preservation. They include panel discussions on a local television station; developing a mobile app highlighting historic places across the county; direct involvement in special events; and its work with organizations and local decision-makers.

Some prominent properties that have been part of is discussions in the last year include the 78th Street Heritage Farm, once the site of the Clark County Poor Farm, and Providence Academy.

The commission members are chairman Robert Hinds, vice chairwoman Sarah Fox, Sean Denniston, Alex Gall, Rob Heaney, Roch Manley and Mark Pelletier. The commission maintains the Clark County Historic Register and reviews proposed design changes to properties on the register.

Members are appointed by the Clark County Council, based on demonstrated special interest, experience or knowledge in history, historic preservation, architecture or related disciplines.

Other winners in nine categories range from a 16-year-old Boy Scout who led an effort to restore a Centralia cemetery all the way up to the U.S. Department of Energy.

The federal agency teamed with the Manhattan Project National Historic Site to restore the former White Bluffs Bank building. Located on the Hanford Site near Richland, the one-room bank building represents all that is left of the former farming community of White Bluffs after being purchased in 1942 by the Manhattan Project for plutonium production.

The award ceremony will be on May 15 in Olympia.

Loading...