Tuesday, August 16, 2022
Aug. 16, 2022

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Clark County reviews speed limits

Council calls for public input on possible changes

By , Columbian staff writer
Published:

Clark County is considering setting or reducing speed limits on eight sections of county roads and is giving residents the chance to opine before any action is taken.

The Clark County Council reviewed speed limit recommendations during a work session Tuesday and set a public hearing for 10 a.m. Tuesday at the Public Service Center, sixth floor hearings room, 1300 Franklin St., Vancouver.

The council is looking at setting speed limits on roads that currently aren’t posted or have posted speed limits but lack formal resolutions to support those limits. The maximum speed on unposted county roads is 50 mph.

Clark County Public Works routinely evaluates speed limits based on residents’ feedback, Clark County Sheriff’s Office requests, county traffic engineer observations, road conditions and more, according to a news release.

The council will examine the following roads:

• Northeast 124th Avenue, from Northeast 99th to Northeast 119th streets: Setting a 30 mph limit to replace the current 25 mph and 40 mph fluctuation.

• Northeast 114th Street, from Northeast 124th to Northeast 132nd avenues: Dropping the speed from 40 mph to 25 mph.

• Northeast 164th Street, from Northeast 182nd to Northeast 205th avenues: Passing a formal resolution to support the current 40 mph limit.

• Northeast 202nd Avenue, from Northeast 164th Street south for 500 feet: Passing a formal resolution to support the current 40 mph limit.

• Northeast 262nd Avenue, from Northeast Bradford Road north for 0.63 mile: Setting a 35 mph speed limit, down from the unposted 50 mph limit.

• Northeast 312th Avenue, from Northeast Ireland Road south to the road’s end: Setting a 25 mph speed limit, down from the unposted 50 mph limit.

• Northeast Borin Road, from Northeast Hughes Road to Northeast 412th Avenue: Setting a 30 mph speed limit, down from the unposted 50 mph limit.

Columbian staff writer

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