Tuesday, August 11, 2020
Aug. 11, 2020

Linkedin Pinterest

Check It Out: Unleash power of library card

By
Published:
4 Photos
Photo Gallery

Let’s hear it for September because it’s Library Card Sign-up Month. Yay! Of course, you can get a library card any time of the year, but getting a card in September is extra special, so if you don’t have one, do it today!

We would love for everyone in the many communities we serve to proudly have a library card. Not only can you use it to check out books, a library card gives you the ability to borrow DVDs, audiobooks, children’s music CDs, and magazines; download e-books and e-audio from our extensive digital collection; stream music from the Freegal Music database; and search the library’s selection of online resources including Ancestry Library for genealogical information, ProQuest Newspapers for access to over 900 publications, and Alldata Repair for auto repair details for vehicles manufactured since 1982. In other words, a library card is a very powerful tool.

For our youngest library patrons, library cards are also full of magic. We know this because we get to see the faces of our new readers whenever they get their first library card. As adults we tend to take such privileges for granted, but when a child receives a library card, the whole world opens up through the magic of reading. Library staff have the honor of seeing these moments of wonder, and trust me, it never gets old.

To all our current and future library patrons, here’s to you. I’ve created a short list of picture books with a library or reading-related theme, and while I hope it inspires parents and caregivers to check out these titles for their little readers at home, I encourage adults to add a few — or all — to your own reading list. Perhaps you’ll get to relive that moment when you signed up for your first library card, allowing you to become a library patron, a member of an incredible reading community, the holder of a powerful and magical tool. Libraries rock, and so do our patrons!

• “A Big Surprise for Little Card,” by Charise Mericle Harper. Library cards have feelings too, and when one little card realizes that his job is to help people check out books, how sweet it is!

• “Bunny’s Book Club,” by Annie Silvestro. Anyone who has followed my column for very long knows my deep and sincere love for animals and picture books. So, what does a book-loving bunny do when storytime at the library moves indoors for the winter? He doesn’t want to miss reading time, which means he needs a solution for getting inside the library. Sweet and charming, this celebration of books and reading-friendly animals feels just right for this reading list.

• “Hooray for Books!” by Brian Won. Turtle has a favorite book, and when he has trouble locating it — because he let his friends borrow it — life is not too happy. Not to worry, though. The book is found, Turtle is happy, and here’s a bonus — Turtle learns that sharing books is super cool.

• “The Library Book,” by Tom Chapin and Michael Mark. “Saturday morning and the rain is pouring,” starts this starred review picture book, celebrating reading, libraries and to not letting the rain dampen the spirit. Northwest readers will be able to relate, not just to the weather, but to letting old friends like Winnie the Pooh, Sleeping Beauty, and Cat in the Hat bring sunshine to a young reader’s day.

• “Library Day,” by Anne Rockwell. If you have a little one who’s never been to the library and has no idea what to expect, this happy picture book will introduce library newbies to the wonderful experiences awaiting them. Participating in storytime, getting a library card, meeting new friends, Don and his dad check out books and interact with the magical world of the library.

• “Littlebat’s Halloween Story,” by Diane Mayr. Halloween is just around the corner, so a book about a young bat who really wants to attend a library storytime is perfect for the season. How he eventually gets to attend a storytime is super sweet and very unscary.

• “Madeline Finn and the Library Dog,” by Lisa Papp. Sometimes it’s intimidating to read out loud, especially to a grown-up. Madeline Finn feels this way, but when she’s encouraged to read to a dog, the fear of making a mistake loses its power. By the way, reading out loud to your cat is OK, too. Just don’t be offended if your feline audience … well … ignores you. That’s a cat for you.

• “Waiting for the Biblioburro,” by Monica Brown. A library doesn’t have to have four walls to be a library. Let little ones discover how a burro carrying books reaches those who love to read but have no building to visit.

Loading...