Wednesday, February 1, 2023
Feb. 1, 2023

Linkedin Pinterest

Sculpture reveal at Vancouver Waterfront Park part of First Friday

By , Columbian staff writer
Published:
2 Photos
A new public art piece titled Wind-and-Wave is on display at Vancouver Waterfront Park. The piece, by Jennifer Corio and Dave Frei of Cobalt Designworks, was donated by the Kenneth and Eunice Teter Charitable Trust. It will be the first public art installation to be unveiled since the city formed its Culture, Art and Heritage Commission.
A new public art piece titled Wind-and-Wave is on display at Vancouver Waterfront Park. The piece, by Jennifer Corio and Dave Frei of Cobalt Designworks, was donated by the Kenneth and Eunice Teter Charitable Trust. It will be the first public art installation to be unveiled since the city formed its Culture, Art and Heritage Commission. (Alisha Jucevic/The Columbian) Photo Gallery

A new art installation will be unveiled Friday evening as part of Vancouver’s monthly First Friday art walk event.

Wind-and-Wave, a stainless steel metalwork piece by husband-wife duo Dave Frei and Jennifer Corio, is at Vancouver Waterfront Park. It will make its debut to the public at 5 p.m. with a ceremony featuring remarks from Mayor Anne McEnerny-Ogle and Maureen Montague, chair of the city’s new Culture, Art and Heritage Commission.

The duo “are going to say a few words, and then we’re going to unveil the piece,” said Kerry Peck, the commission’s support specialist.

The piece was commissioned by the Kenneth and Eunice Teter Charitable Trust and donated to the city. Corio and Frei are the artists behind Cobalt Designworks, a Vancouver-based studio.

According to the event’s Facebook page, the artists wanted to capture “the Teters’ love of water” with the blue and silver piece. Wind-and-Wave stands 6 feet tall, with a square base 3 feet wide.

If You Go

What: Public unveiling of Wind-and-Wave sculpture by Dave Frei and Jennifer Corio

Where: Vancouver Waterfront Park

When: 5 p.m. today

The new installation marks the first piece of public art to be unveiled since the city formed the Culture, Art and Heritage Commission over the summer. That was a reincarnation of sorts of the Cultural Commission established in 1994 but suspended in 2005 during what a city official described as “the budget-cutting years.”

“We’re very excited about it,” Montague said. “It’s part of First Friday, so we’re hoping people will come out.”

Loading...
Columbian staff writer