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Friday, March 1, 2024
March 1, 2024

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Go: Unpublished Writers’ Day, lives of dead trees, Black history

By , Columbian staff writer
Published:
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Maestro Gerard Schwarz will lead the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in a performance of Tchaikovsky&#039;s Symphony No. 4 on Jan. 25 and 26. He&#039;ll be joined onstage by his son, cellist Julian Schwarz.
Maestro Gerard Schwarz will lead the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in a performance of Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 4 on Jan. 25 and 26. He'll be joined onstage by his son, cellist Julian Schwarz. (Ben VanHouten) Photo Gallery

1. Like father, like son

Maestro Gerard Schwarz guest conducts the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra at two concerts — 3 p.m. Jan. 25 and 7 p.m. Jan. 26 — with his son, Julian, on cello. Schwarz is the seven-time Emmy-winning music director of the All-Star Orchestra, Eastern Music Festival, Palm Beach Symphony and Mozart Orchestra of New York, conductor laureate of the Seattle Symphony and conductor emeritus of the Mostly Mozart Festival. Audiences will be treated to Tchaikovsky’s magnificent Symphony No. 4, along with Joan Tower’s “Sixth Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman” and Dvorak’s Cello Concerto. Concerts are at Skyview Concert Hall, 1300 N.W. 139th St., Vancouver. Tickets are $10 to $40. 360-735-7278 or vancouversymphony.org

2. Write on

Do you have a novel, short story or script languishing in a desk drawer? National Unpublished Writers’ Day, Jan 25, is for you. The Clark County Historical Museum — along with Artstra and Washington State University Vancouver — is hosting a free event from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. featuring readings, workshops on writing and publishing, and information and activities for writers. The day also celebrates the birthday of poet and novelist Richard Brautigan, born in Washington on Jan. 30, 1935. Brautigan scholar John Barber notes that this internationally celebrated author “suffered many rejections before achieving success as a writer.” The message: Hang in there and, above all, keep writing. 360-993-5679 or www.cchmuseum.org

3. Circle of life

What happens when a tree falls in the forest? According to Gifford Pinchot National Forest Ranger Daphne Schmidt, it’s the beginning of a fascinating sequence of decomposition, which in turn supports a huge variety of new life, from mushrooms to insects and birds to whole new trees. Learn about the stages of tree decomposition and the life that happens in the tree at each of these stages during “Dead Trees Are Full of Life,” 11 a.m. to noon Jan. 25 at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center, 1501 E. Evergreen Blvd., Vancouver. Schmidt will discuss her specialized knowledge of fallen trees and answer questions in this free presentation. No RSVP necessary — just bring your curiosity. 360-816-6216 or friendsfortvancouver.org or www.nps.gov

4. Jazz it up

The 58th annual Clark College Jazz Festival, happening now through Jan. 25 in the Gaiser Student Center at Clark College, 1933 Fort Vancouver Way, offers back-to-back performances of exhilarating big band jazz. Hear the best middle- and high-school jazz ensembles from Washington and Oregon, competing for the Dale Beacock Memorial Sweepstakes Award. The award-winning Clark College Jazz Band will also perform at noon and 8:30 p.m. Jan. 24 and at 12:20 p.m. Jan. 25. Want to know what the best of the best sounds like? Last year’s Sweepstakes Award winner will perform at 8:30 p.m. Jan. 25. Admission is $5 per day, and kids 12 or younger are free. www.clark.edu/campus-life/arts-events/music/jazz_festival

The NAACP will kick off Black History Month from noon to 4 p.m. Jan. 25 at Vancouver Community Library, 901 C St. Highlights include a panel of descendants from Vancouver’s “First Families,” African Americans who moved here before 1945; they’ll explore Vancouver’s own Black history through the lens of personal experiences and family stories. The celebration also features an exhibit, “The Lost Ark of African American Art, History and Experience in Vancouver and the Northwest,” on display through February. Buffalo soldiers will preview a trailer from their new movie project and discuss their history and artifacts on display in the exhibit. Habiba Addo will present folktales, drumming and dance. 360-406-4770 or www.naacpvancouverwa.org

5. Vancouver’s Black history

The NAACP will kick off Black History Month from noon to 4 p.m. Jan. 25 at Vancouver Community Library, 901 C St. Highlights include a panel of descendants from Vancouver’s “First Families,” African Americans who moved here before 1945; they’ll explore Vancouver’s own Black history through the lens of personal experiences and family stories. The celebration also features an exhibit, “The Lost Ark of African American Art, History and Experience in Vancouver and the Northwest,” on display through February. Buffalo soldiers will preview a trailer from their new movie project and discuss their history and artifacts on display in the exhibit. Habiba Addo will present folktales, drumming and dance. 360-406-4770 or www.naacpvancouverwa.org

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