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News / Health / Clark County Health

COVID vaccines fall short for transplant recipients

Anti-rejection drugs drastically reduce their efficiency

By Beverly Corbell, for The Columbian
Published: August 5, 2021, 6:05am
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Vancouver resident Laura Ellsworth sits on a park bench for a portrait July 29 at Esther Short Park. Ellsworth is a fully vaccinated kidney transplant recipient but doesn't have full protection from COVID-19. She was part of a study on COVID-19 vaccines in immunocompromised patients.
Vancouver resident Laura Ellsworth sits on a park bench for a portrait July 29 at Esther Short Park. Ellsworth is a fully vaccinated kidney transplant recipient but doesn't have full protection from COVID-19. She was part of a study on COVID-19 vaccines in immunocompromised patients. (Joshua Hart/The Columbian) Photo Gallery

In spite of being fully vaccinated, Laura Ellsworth lives in fear of catching COVID-19.

That’s because she’s had a kidney transplant and her anti-rejection drugs drastically reduce the efficiency of the vaccine.

Ellsworth found out she was not protected only when she took part in an antibody testing study by Johns Hopkins University of people like her who were vaccinated but immunocompromised.

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