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More than 38,000 still without power after Oregon ice storm

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A large tree downed in a weekend ice storm sits atop power lines on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021 in Lake Oswego, Ore. Nearly 150,000 customers remained without power Wednesday in and around Portland, Oregon, nearly a week after a massive snow and ice storm swept into the Pacific Northwest, taking out hundreds of miles of power lines as ice-laden trees toppled.
A large tree downed in a weekend ice storm sits atop power lines on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021 in Lake Oswego, Ore. Nearly 150,000 customers remained without power Wednesday in and around Portland, Oregon, nearly a week after a massive snow and ice storm swept into the Pacific Northwest, taking out hundreds of miles of power lines as ice-laden trees toppled. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus) Photo Gallery

PORTLAND — More than 38,000 customers remained without power on Sunday in the wake of an ice storm that wreaked havoc on the electrical grid in greater Portland, Oregon beginning more than a week ago.

Portland General Electric said it restored power to more than 14,000 customers Saturday as it faced ongoing challenges with restoring the grid. The utility said more 400 crews were at work trying to restore power to remaining customers.

The worst ice storm in 40 years knocked out power to more than 350,000 residents at its peak and killed five people, including four who died from carbon monoxide poisoning as they tried to stay warm.

The damage and dangerous conditions left behind by the storm that started Feb. 12 were the worst in the history of Portland General Electric, according to the company.

One-quarter of customers lost power multiple times over the course of the three-day storm as ice-laden trees fell on lines. A layer of ice an inch thick coated power lines and trees, adding 1,000 pounds of extra weight to each span of wire from pole to pole, PGE said.

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