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June 30, 2022

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Uptown Vancouver’s Pho Haven closes

New owner could not meet building health code requirements, according to Clark County Public Health

By , Columbian Innovation Editor
Published:
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Pho Haven, a Vancouver Vietnamese restaurant at 2014 Main St., is closed indefinitely after a new owner could not meet building health code requirements.
Pho Haven, a Vancouver Vietnamese restaurant at 2014 Main St., is closed indefinitely after a new owner could not meet building health code requirements. (Amanda Cowan/The Columbian) Photo Gallery

Pho Haven, a Vietnamese restaurant in Vancouver’s Uptown Village, is closed indefinitely after a new owner could not meet building health code requirements.

The past owners and current landlords of the building at 2014 Main St., Thuy Huynh and Andrew Le, applied for a change of ownership at the end of last year. The new owner of the restaurant is Mandy K. Huynh and Stanley Co, who also owns Pho House Cafe & Deli, 316 S.E. 123rd Ave.

Mandy K. Huynh was “not able to satisfactorily complete a pre-opening inspection in March, due primarily to facility improvements that were needed,” according to Brigette Holland, food safety manager with Clark County Public Health. “Additional time was granted to complete facility improvements, but after discussion with the landlord, the business owner chose not to move forward with obtaining a food permit.”

The Columbian could not reach Mandy K. Huynh or Co after numerous emails and messages to the company on Facebook, and the company’s website is no longer operating.

The Columbian also could not reach Thuy Huynh and Andrew Le, who bought the property in 2015 for $585,000, according to county property records.

The building was constructed around 1910. Before Pho Haven, it housed Mint Tea, which closed in 2015.

This story was updated to include the names of the new owners.

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