Thursday, October 6, 2022
Oct. 6, 2022

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Check It Out: Celebrate country living with fair-themed books

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It’s county fair time, and I am primed to attend. Our local Clark County Fair hasn’t taken place since 2019 — for very obvious reasons — so regular fairgoers are excited to see the return of Demolition Derby; the Junior Livestock Auction; handmade milkshakes at the Clark County Dairy Women’s booth; carnival rides; concerts; hanging out with alpacas, llamas and pygmy goats; and much, much more.

A county fair is a tried and true American institution, bringing together communities to showcase the pride and joy of 4-H clubs, the Future Farmers of America organization and anything involved with local talent including the all-important judging of food preservation, craftwork and livestock. In my mind, it’s a great way to escape city life and experience the best of country living. Plus, it’s the perfect excuse to eat hand-dipped corn dogs, grilled onion burgers and deep-fried Twinkies. Because it’s the fair, the judgment-free zone applies to anything food-related. Trust me, it’s a fact.

Tune in to your own county fair vibe by checking out some fair-themed library books. I’ve included titles related to farm living, canning, delicious fair eats and the history of our very own Clark County Fair. Kids can participate, too, by checking out a book about the origin of the Ferris wheel and what it takes to show horses at a local fair.

  • “Backyard Farming: From Raising Chickens to Growing Veggies, the Beginner’s Guide to Running a Self-Sustaining Farm” by Adams Media.
  • “Blue Ribbon Canning: Award-Winning Recipes — Jams, Preserves, Pickles, Sauces & More” by Linda J. Amendt.
  • “Clark County Fair History: 137 Years” by Janice Ferguson.
  • “Fair Foods: The Most Popular and Offbeat Recipes from America’s State & County Fairs” by George Geary.
  • “The Fantastic Ferris Wheel: The Story of George Ferris” written by Betsy Harvey Kraft, illustrated by Steven Salerno.
  • “Showing Horses at the Fair” by Jennifer Wendt.

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