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May 26, 2022

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Battle Ground man accused of selling Vancouver man pills that caused his death

By , Columbian Assistant Metro Editor
Published:

A Battle Ground man is accused of selling a Vancouver man narcotics, including fentanyl pills, that authorities say caused his death in August.

The victim was identified in court records as 31-year-old Mychal Schneider.

On Thursday, Travis R. Timme, 32, appeared in Clark County Superior Court on suspicion of possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver and controlled substance homicide.

Judge Derek Vanderwood set Timme’s bail at $100,000. He is scheduled to be arraigned Feb. 3.

On Aug. 19, Schneider was found dead at his residence in the 1400 block of Northeast 140th Avenue by his half brother, Brady Williams. Responding police located multiple pills and medication throughout the residence. Officers also learned that a man, known only as “Travis,” had come to the residence and left before they arrived, according to an affidavit of probable cause.

The Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office later determined Schneider died of a lung abscess caused by ingesting methamphetamine and fentanyl, the affidavit says.

Williams told police he believed “Travis” had been selling narcotics to Schneider and that they last saw each other around 3 p.m. Aug. 18, according to court records.

Investigators later met with Schneider’s mother, and she told them she found messages on Schneider’s phone from Timme indicating he was selling Schneider narcotics, court records state.

After searching Schneider’s phone and Timme’s Facebook account, investigators learned Schneider had purchased drugs from Timme multiple times.

Investigators served a search warrant Wednesday at Timme’s residence, court records say, and he was taken into custody after driving away from the area.

Timme allegedly told police he provided Schneider with fentanyl and methamphetamine about 24 hours before he was found dead. He said he provided Schneider with three to four blue fentanyl pills, according to the affidavit.

“Timme stated that he felt somewhat responsible for Schneider’s death,” the officer wrote in the affidavit.

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