Thursday, August 11, 2022
Aug. 11, 2022

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Check It Out: Try nonfiction for summer reading

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Welcome to July 2022! It’s that time of year when publishers, reviewers and readers fond of reading lists embrace that summertime favorite, “Beach Reads.” These lists can be a lot of fun to peruse, and I have to admit I am one of those readers who loves reading lists (in case you hadn’t figured that out already). I find, however, that recommendations for “Beach Reads” tend to favor fiction, especially of the light and breezy type, which I suppose makes sense when you’re lounging by the beach/pool/backyard sprinklers. I get it, and I support it. But you might be missing out on engaging nonfiction reads, and I wouldn’t want that. So, how about a new-nonfiction-at-your-library-you-can-read-at-the-beach-or-anywhere-you-please list?

Being the book nerd (and word nerd) that I am, I decided to create this nonfiction, to-beach-or-not-to-beach reading list on the letters of the word “summer.” If you’re used to my recommendations arranged in alphabetical order, don’t worry — I haven’t suddenly lost my ability to alphabetize. This week’s list follows a S-U-M-M-E-R order as in Special-Unusual-Mixed-Mingled-Eclectic-Reads. By the way, I just might have broken my brain coming up with that. Whew.

Here’s to medicine, nature, cooking, music, home maintenance and rivers. Beach optional.

  • “Spare Parts: The Story of Medicine Through the History of Transplant Surgery” by Paul Craddock.
  • “Urban Wild: 52 Ways to Find Wildness on Your Doorstop” by Helen Rook.
  • “Mi Cocina: Recipes and Rapture from My Kitchen in Mexico” by Rick Martinez.
  • “Musical Revolutions: How the Sounds of the Western World Changed” by Stuart Isacoff.
  • “Essential Home Skills Handbook: Everything You Need to Know as a New Homeowner” by Chris Peterson.
  • “River of the Gods: Genius, Courage, and Betrayal in the Search for the Source of the Nile” by Candice Millard.

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