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Aug. 16, 2022

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Battle Ground man sentenced to 18 months in prison in 2019 standoff with police

By , Columbian staff writer
Published:

A Battle Ground man was sentenced Tuesday to 18 months in federal prison in connection with a six-hour police standoff in December 2019.

Lynn Manley Cargile, 44, was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Seattle, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. He pleaded guilty in December to being a felon in possession of firearms.

Cargile’s ex-wife called 911 on Dec. 26, 2019, to report that she’d been assaulted, a U.S. Attorney’s Office news release states.

Court records say that after a lengthy standoff, police used “flash-bangs” to get Cargile to come outside, where officers arrested him. When officers went inside the house, they found numerous firearms, including a Smith & Wesson AR-15-style rifle with a swastika on the rifle butt and a Black Rain Ordnance short-barreled rifle.

They also found two silencers, one of which was marked with a Nazi symbol, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said.

Cargile was not allowed to have firearms because of previous Clark County convictions of attempting to elude in 2002 and 2003, and illegal firearms possession in 1999 and 2002, the news release states.

At sentencing Tuesday, Cargile renounced his white supremacist views, according to the news release.

“For the first time in my life, I want to do something different,” Cargile said in the news release. “I want to do gang intervention and give back to the community. … My goal is to be a good dad, serve God and give back to my community.”

According to the news release, Chief U.S. District Judge Ricardo S. Martinez said, “If you want your children to have a different life (than you), it’s up to you to model that for them.”

Cargile was in a state prison until August, serving a 29-month prison sentence for domestic violence related to the December 2019 incident, and then he was indicted on the federal firearms charges.

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