Thursday, October 6, 2022
Oct. 6, 2022

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Fire District 3 welcomes new commissioner, sees other personnel changes

The Columbian
Published:

BRUSH PRAIRIE — Fire District 3 Commissioner Dean Thornberry was sworn in on Aug. 8 to replace Scott Anders, who stepped down after accepting a job in another state.

Thornberry has spent 25 years in fire service, including 12 years with Clark County Fire District 3. He retired in 2016 as deputy chief at East County Fire & Rescue. A lifelong Clark County resident, Thornberry grew up in Ridgefield but now lives with his wife in Battle Ground. He has two children and two grandchildren. His hobbies include hunting, fishing and woodworking.

Firefighter/paramedic Dustin Waliezer has been promoted to EMS captain. He is responsible for EMS training, long-range measurable goals and quality assurance. Waliezer began his career in 2001 as a volunteer with Clark County Fire District 3 and was inspired by his father’s service to pursue a career in fire/emergency medical services. He earned an associate degree in paramedicine from Oregon Health Science University and is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in EMS management through the Oregon Institute of Technology and the Managing Officers Program through the National Fire Academy.

Capt. Rob Moon is the fire district’s new cadet program director, responsible for cadet training and retention of the High School Fire Cadet Program. Moon started volunteering with the district in 1999 as a from-home responder, becoming a shift volunteer in 2002. He was hired as a career firefighter in 2004. In 2012, he became an instructor with the Cadet Program. In 2016, he earned an associate degree from Portland Community College.

The fire district welcomes five new hires to replace four retiring members and Waliezer’s former firefighter position. Firefighters Tim Axelson and Bryan Bosch are former Clark County Fire District 3 volunteers, while Joseph Harnett, Hayden Lent and Adam Strizak are new to the district.

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