Monday, October 3, 2022
Oct. 3, 2022

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Interstate 5 Bridge replacement project submits federal grant application

October 3, 2022, 5:40pm Clark County News

The Interstate Bridge Replacement project submitted its first major federal grant application for $750 million in early August, heading toward its goal of breaking ground by late 2025 to early… Read story

Dozens of rabbits soon to be available for adoption at Humane Society for Southwest Washington

October 3, 2022, 4:44pm Clark County News

Nearly 100 bunnies will soon be available for adoption through the Humane Society for Southwest Washington after their owner surrendered them to Clark County Animal Control. Read story

The Clark County Courthouse (The Columbian files)

Vancouver travel trailer thief sentenced to prison

The Clark County Courthouse (The Columbian files)

October 3, 2022, 3:23pm Clark County News

A Vancouver man was sentenced Monday to 17 months in prison for stealing nearly $200,000 worth of travel trailers from Brush Prairie and Sunnyside storage facilities. Read story

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson speaks March 23, 2022, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash.  (AP Photo/Ted S.

$518M from opioid settlement starts heading to Washington

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson speaks March 23, 2022, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash.  (AP Photo/Ted S.

October 3, 2022, 3:09pm Health

The first payments from a $518 million settlement with the nation’s three largest opioid distributors will begin reaching Washington communities in December, providing much-needed cash officials can use to hire first responders or direct toward prevention, treatment and other services, Attorney General Bob Ferguson said Monday. Read story

Vancouver man to face charges in pedestrian hit-and-run death

October 3, 2022, 1:26pm Clark County News

Prosecutors intend to file a charge of vehicular homicide against an 18-year-old Vancouver man after the pedestrian victim in a Sunday crash died Monday morning. Read story

Tiffany Smiley, a Republican from Pasco, Wash., poses for a photo on Feb. 24, 2022 in Seattle. Smiley is challenging Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., for her seat in the U.S. Senate.

Washington Senate candidate Tiffany Smiley criticizes Seattle Times, Starbucks, Seahawks

Tiffany Smiley, a Republican from Pasco, Wash., poses for a photo on Feb. 24, 2022 in Seattle. Smiley is challenging Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., for her seat in the U.S. Senate.

October 3, 2022, 7:46am Election

Three Seattle-based corporations, including The Seattle Times, have asked Tiffany Smiley, the Republican challenger for U.S. Senate, to stop using their copyrighted material in campaign ads, spurring a fiery response from Smiley's campaign, which filed a complaint with the Federal Election Commission. Read story

Tenny Creek, a three-story, 40-unit assisted living facility that will provide critical housing and support for formerly homeless individuals with complex behavioral and physical health challenges, celebrated its grand opening in May.

Low-income housing and affordable housing: What’s the difference?

Tenny Creek, a three-story, 40-unit assisted living facility that will provide critical housing and support for formerly homeless individuals with complex behavioral and physical health challenges, celebrated its grand opening in May.

October 3, 2022, 6:05am Business

The terms low-income housing and affordable housing are often used interchangeably, causing confusion for many. Read story

In this Jan. 28, 2016, file photo, a man does maintenance work between razor wire-topped fences at the Monroe Correctional Complex in Monroe, Wash. The Washington state Office of Corrections has more than half a dozen systemic issue reports in progress or nearly complete detailing conditions inside state prisons that have yet to be released. They examined issues like deaths in prisons due to COVID-19, instances of retaliation by prison workers, mail policy, health care and other issues.

Shelved report details 14 COVID deaths inside Washington prisons

In this Jan. 28, 2016, file photo, a man does maintenance work between razor wire-topped fences at the Monroe Correctional Complex in Monroe, Wash. The Washington state Office of Corrections has more than half a dozen systemic issue reports in progress or nearly complete detailing conditions inside state prisons that have yet to be released. They examined issues like deaths in prisons due to COVID-19, instances of retaliation by prison workers, mail policy, health care and other issues.

October 3, 2022, 6:02am Latest News

When “Patient D” developed symptoms of COVID-19, the incarcerated person requested to be seen by medical staff in one of Washington’s state prisons. Read story

Alkaline batteries are separated and dumped into a bin at the North Seattle Hazardous Waste site, where people can drop off everything from car batteries to lithium-ion batteries, on Monday, Sept. 19, 2022. Washington state is increasing concerned over the number of batteries in use and is spurring a decade-old statewide effort to create a formal battery stewardship program in both Washington state, and more locally within King County.

The complicated process of recycling batteries in Washington

Alkaline batteries are separated and dumped into a bin at the North Seattle Hazardous Waste site, where people can drop off everything from car batteries to lithium-ion batteries, on Monday, Sept. 19, 2022. Washington state is increasing concerned over the number of batteries in use and is spurring a decade-old statewide effort to create a formal battery stewardship program in both Washington state, and more locally within King County.

October 3, 2022, 6:00am Business

At first glance, you might think Phil Currie is holding the world’s least appetizing bar of chocolate. But the damaged computer battery — glossy, dark and segmented into bulging squares within a large Ziploc — presents a much bigger health risk than a Hershey’s. Read story

(Associated Press files)

Washington students can now take excused mental health days

(Associated Press files)

October 3, 2022, 6:00am Latest News

Starting this school year, Washington has joined a growing number of states that can excuse students from school specifically to take care of their mental health. The change comes amid increasing rates of depression and anxiety — which have been steadily rising for at least a decade. Read story