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Oct. 16, 2021

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Climate change

Pope: Climate change requires immediate consensus from world

October 9, 2021, 5:11pm Churches & Religion

Pope Francis on Saturday called on lawmakers worldwide to overcome “the narrow confines” of partisan politics to quickly reach consensus on fighting climate change. Read story

U.S. envoy says climate summit can yield ‘enormous progress’

October 2, 2021, 4:12pm Nation & World

U.S. climate envoy John Kerry said Saturday he thinks “enormous progress” can be made at the upcoming U.N. climate talks in Scotland but more governments must come up with concrete… Read story

FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020 file photo, vehicles drive on a highway as smog envelops the area of Lahore, Pakistan. The World Health Organization said Wednesday Sept. 22, 2021, the negative health impacts of poor air quality kick in at lower levels than it previously thought, announcing revisions to its guidelines on air quality that set a higher bar for policymakers in a world where 90 percent of people already live in areas with one particularly harmful type of pollutant. (AP Photo/K.M.

UN health agency sets higher, tougher bar for air quality

FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020 file photo, vehicles drive on a highway as smog envelops the area of Lahore, Pakistan. The World Health Organization said Wednesday Sept. 22, 2021, the negative health impacts of poor air quality kick in at lower levels than it previously thought, announcing revisions to its guidelines on air quality that set a higher bar for policymakers in a world where 90 percent of people already live in areas with one particularly harmful type of pollutant. (AP Photo/K.M.

September 22, 2021, 10:34am Nation & World

GENEVA — The harmful health effects of air pollution kick in at lower levels than previously thought, the World Health Organization said Wednesday as it set a new standard for policymakers and the public in the first update of its air quality guidelines in 15 years. Read story

In the aftermath of Hurricane Ida people line up for food and ice at a distribution center Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2021, in New Orleans, La.  Louisiana residents still reeling from flooding and damage caused by Hurricane Ida are scrambling for food, gas, water and relief from the oppressive heat.

U.S. unveils plan to protect workers and communities from extreme heat

In the aftermath of Hurricane Ida people line up for food and ice at a distribution center Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2021, in New Orleans, La.  Louisiana residents still reeling from flooding and damage caused by Hurricane Ida are scrambling for food, gas, water and relief from the oppressive heat.

September 20, 2021, 12:21pm Business

WASHINGTON — The Biden administration is moving to protect workers and communities from extreme heat after a dangerously hot summer that spurred an onslaught of drought-worsened wildfires and caused hundreds of deaths from the Pacific Northwest to hurricane-ravaged Louisiana. Read story

FILE - This July 9, 2015, file photo, shows signage outside Procter & Gamble corporate headquarters in downtown Cincinnati, USA. Computer-maker HP, consumer goods giant Procter & Gamble and coffee capsule company Nespresso have joined a corporate pledge to sharply cut their greenhouse gas emissions over the coming 20 years.The Climate Pledge, a grouping of companies and organizations spearheaded by Amazon, said Monday that it has signed up 86 new members for its voluntary measures. In total they now have 201 members with global annual revenues of more than $1.8 trillion.

HP, Procter & Gamble join companies pledge to cut emissions

FILE - This July 9, 2015, file photo, shows signage outside Procter & Gamble corporate headquarters in downtown Cincinnati, USA. Computer-maker HP, consumer goods giant Procter & Gamble and coffee capsule company Nespresso have joined a corporate pledge to sharply cut their greenhouse gas emissions over the coming 20 years.The Climate Pledge, a grouping of companies and organizations spearheaded by Amazon, said Monday that it has signed up 86 new members for its voluntary measures. In total they now have 201 members with global annual revenues of more than $1.8 trillion.

September 20, 2021, 10:10am Business

BERLIN — Computer-maker HP, consumer goods business Procter & Gamble and coffee capsule company Nespresso have joined a corporate pledge to sharply cut their greenhouse gas emissions over nearly two decades. Read story

(istock.com)

2021 a record-breaking drought year in parts of Washington

(istock.com)

September 20, 2021, 10:08am Latest News

SPOKANE — This has been a record-breaking year of drought in much of Eastern Washington, state officials say. Read story

Report: Most nations fall far short in plans to curb warming

September 15, 2021, 10:30am Nation & World

Nearly every nation is coming up short — most of them far short — in their efforts to fight climate change, and the world is unlikely to hold warming to the internationally agreed-upon limit, according to a new scientific report. Read story

FILE - In this file photo taken Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020, a Samburu boy uses a wooden stick to try to swat a swarm of desert locusts filling the air, as he herds his camel near the village of Sissia, in Samburu county, Kenya. Climate change could push more than 200 million people to move within their own countries in the next three decades and create migration hotspots unless urgent action is taken in the coming years to reduce global emissions and bridge the development gap, a World Bank report has found. The report published on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021 examines how long-term impacts of climate change such as water scarcity, decreasing crop productivity and rising sea levels could lead to millions of what the report describes as "climate migrants" by 2050.

Report: Climate change could see 200 million move by 2050

FILE - In this file photo taken Thursday, Jan. 16, 2020, a Samburu boy uses a wooden stick to try to swat a swarm of desert locusts filling the air, as he herds his camel near the village of Sissia, in Samburu county, Kenya. Climate change could push more than 200 million people to move within their own countries in the next three decades and create migration hotspots unless urgent action is taken in the coming years to reduce global emissions and bridge the development gap, a World Bank report has found. The report published on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021 examines how long-term impacts of climate change such as water scarcity, decreasing crop productivity and rising sea levels could lead to millions of what the report describes as "climate migrants" by 2050.

September 13, 2021, 12:44pm Latest News

BARCELONA, Spain — Climate change could push more than 200 million people to leave their homes in the next three decades and create migration hot spots unless urgent action is taken to reduce global emissions and bridge the development gap, a World Bank report has found. Read story

The sun shines near the Space Needle on June 28 in Seattle. Record-breaking heat, with temperatures soaring well above 100 degrees, may become more common as climate change affects the Pacific Northwest. (Ted S.

What does climate report foresee for Northwest?

The sun shines near the Space Needle on June 28 in Seattle. Record-breaking heat, with temperatures soaring well above 100 degrees, may become more common as climate change affects the Pacific Northwest. (Ted S.

August 10, 2021, 6:04am Northwest

SEATTLE — In the Pacific Northwest, shrinking glaciers, extreme heat waves, worsening droughts and acidifying oceans are all symptoms of climate change, which is affecting every corner of the globe and intensifying as emissions rise. Read story

Flames burn a house at Pefki village on Evia island, about 189 kilometers (118 miles) north of Athens, Greece, Sunday, Aug. 8, 2021. Pillars of billowing smoke and ash are blocking out the sun above Greece's second-largest island as a days-old wildfire devours pristine forests and triggers more evacuation alerts.

Forest fire ravages Greek island

Flames burn a house at Pefki village on Evia island, about 189 kilometers (118 miles) north of Athens, Greece, Sunday, Aug. 8, 2021. Pillars of billowing smoke and ash are blocking out the sun above Greece's second-largest island as a days-old wildfire devours pristine forests and triggers more evacuation alerts.

August 9, 2021, 7:05pm Nation & World

ARKITSA, Greece — Firefighters and residents battled into the night Monday for a seventh day against a massive fire on Greece’s second-largest island as the nation endured what the prime minister described as “a natural disaster of unprecedented proportions.” Read story