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Nov. 28, 2022

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Decarbonizing Cascadia

InvestigateWest: Airport debate example of united activists in the Northwest

November 28, 2021, 10:30am Latest News

When Seattle’s first commercial airport opened in 1928, Georgetown had been a vibrant community for more than half a century. Read story

Dream of high speed rail in the Northwest may finally be on the horizon

November 22, 2021, 6:04am Latest News

In August, Charlie Hamilton trekked from Seattle to Spokane, evangelizing a two-decade-old idea to resurrect an east-west passenger rail route. The proposal would link fast-growing cities like Ellensburg and Yakima… Read story

InvestigateWest: Cleaner buildings will cost billions

October 25, 2021, 6:05am Latest News

Pumping insulation into walls and scrapping gas furnaces aren’t the most glamorous ways to attack climate change. Renovating old buildings seems downright mundane compared to fast-charging elec-tric cars or efficient high-rise buildings. But for Francisco Ramos, upgrading his Northeast Portland home made a huge difference. Read story

Brandon Swanson / bswanson@chronline.com The TransAlta steam plant near Centralia is seen from the air Oct. 7. Boxcars filled with coal for the TransAlta steam power plant wait on railroad tracks outside Centralia Feb. 24.

InvestigateWest: Can West learn to share renewable power?

Brandon Swanson / bswanson@chronline.com The TransAlta steam plant near Centralia is seen from the air Oct. 7. Boxcars filled with coal for the TransAlta steam power plant wait on railroad tracks outside Centralia Feb. 24.

August 30, 2021, 6:00am Latest News

March of 2019 opened with a deep chill across Cascadia. Arctic air poured south, jacking up energy consumption and straining energy supplies in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia. It conjured a “perfect” storm for the region’s electricity grid. Read story

A foggy morning scene on the Columbia River near The Dalles, Oregon

Proposal to lay cables under Columbia River met with skepticism

A foggy morning scene on the Columbia River near The Dalles, Oregon

July 24, 2021, 6:00am Editor's Choice

Can slicing a 100-mile trench into the bed of the Columbia River be good for the environment? The answer is a big yes, says a team of energy developers that proposes submerging power cables in the riverbed. Read story

Frank Lemos (Provided photo)

InvestigateWest: Cascadia needs stronger clean-fuels push.

Frank Lemos (Provided photo)

May 3, 2021, 6:02am Latest News

These days Frank Lemos manages a shipping operation, but the former truck driver still gets behind the wheel occasionally to train new drivers or to fill a staffing hole. When he does, he notices a big difference. The firm recently moved away from conventional diesel fuel, and now there’s something… Read story

Nick Neathamer, left, and Rafer Stromme, members of the student grounds crew, clean solar panels at Clark Public Utilities in 2019. The panels need to be cleaned to remove dust to maximize energy production.

Studies: Renewable electricity can slash Cascadia pollution

Nick Neathamer, left, and Rafer Stromme, members of the student grounds crew, clean solar panels at Clark Public Utilities in 2019. The panels need to be cleaned to remove dust to maximize energy production.

April 25, 2021, 6:00am Latest News

New research shows that renewable electricity can move Washington, Oregon and British Columbia off of fossil fuels, do so at an affordable price, and create jobs along the way. Read story

Protesters from the Mosquito Fleet paddled out from Kelley Point Park in Portland on Monday to the Port of Vancouver to protest a cargo ship they say is carrying pipe to be used for an expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline.

InvestigateWest: Activists fight fossil-fuel pipelines

Protesters from the Mosquito Fleet paddled out from Kelley Point Park in Portland on Monday to the Port of Vancouver to protest a cargo ship they say is carrying pipe to be used for an expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline.

March 22, 2021, 6:00am Latest News

Members of Canada’s First Nations and their allies are mounting last-ditch challenges to two massive fossil fuel pipelines that already are under construction and have strong government backing. Read story

Shawn Thornton hugs his wife, Shannon Thornton, next to the rubble of their burned home Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020, in Malden, Washington the day after a fast-moving wildfire swept through the tiny town west of Rosalia. Shawn and Shannon weren't home at the time, but their son Cody was and managed to get their dog and a few belongings before leaving just minutes before the flames swept through.

InvestigateWest: Cascadia mapping shows climate inequities

Shawn Thornton hugs his wife, Shannon Thornton, next to the rubble of their burned home Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020, in Malden, Washington the day after a fast-moving wildfire swept through the tiny town west of Rosalia. Shawn and Shannon weren't home at the time, but their son Cody was and managed to get their dog and a few belongings before leaving just minutes before the flames swept through.

February 28, 2021, 2:45pm Latest News

Residents of 152 cities and towns in the Pacific Northwest are particularly vulnerable to climate-fueled wildfires. Residents of 60 other communities are most susceptible to floods. And people living in 75 towns are most liable to suffer — maybe even die — because of heat waves. Read story

Demonstrators set up at the Port of Vancouver to protest the Trans Mountain Pipeline.

InvestigateWest: Washington state plan would slash emissions

Demonstrators set up at the Port of Vancouver to protest the Trans Mountain Pipeline.

January 31, 2021, 12:45pm Latest News

After more than a decade of the supposedly eco-friendly Pacific Northwest and British Columbia falling short on pledges to fight climate change, a new blueprint emerged this month for how to eliminate all but a sliver of fossil-fuel emissions. Read story